August 1974
Volume 13, Issue 8
Free
Articles  |   August 1974
Velocity Characteristics of Normal Human Saccades
Author Affiliations
  • D. BOGHEN
    Ocular Motor Neurophysiology Laboratory, Miami Veterans Administration Hospital and the Department of Neurology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.
  • B. T. TROOST
    Ocular Motor Neurophysiology Laboratory, Miami Veterans Administration Hospital and the Department of Neurology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.
  • R. B. DAROFF
    Ocular Motor Neurophysiology Laboratory, Miami Veterans Administration Hospital and the Department of Neurology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.
  • L. F. DELL'OSSO
    Ocular Motor Neurophysiology Laboratory, Miami Veterans Administration Hospital and the Department of Neurology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.
  • J. E. BIRKETT
    Ocular Motor Neurophysiology Laboratory, Miami Veterans Administration Hospital and the Department of Neurology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1974, Vol.13, 619-623. doi:https://doi.org/
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      D. BOGHEN, B. T. TROOST, R. B. DAROFF, L. F. DELL'OSSO, J. E. BIRKETT; Velocity Characteristics of Normal Human Saccades. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1974;13(8):619-623. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

There is lack of agreement concerning many velocity-amplitude characteristics of saccadic eye movements. We analyzed, in 15 normal subjects, factors such as abduction, adduction, centering, eccentric, and across-the-center refixations to determine their possible influence upon peak velocity (PV) for 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30° movements. There was considerable intra- and intersubject variability in PV at each amplitude. Analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant difference among the various types of saccades except for the average PV of adduction refixations which was significantly greater at the 30° amplitude. Comparison of conventional 25 Hz. baiulwidth direct current electro-oculography (EOG) and 100 Hz. bandwidth infrared reflection showed higher values with the latter technique. We obtained normative data on saccadic velocity which permits definition of "pathologic slowness." The lower limits of normal mean PV for saccades of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30° are 114, 167, 188, and 200° per second for conventional EOG and 145, 196, 213, and 227° per second for infrared reflection. Any mean PV which falls below these values should be considered abnormal.

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