January 2000
Volume 41, Issue 1
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Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  |   January 2000
Expression Profile and Chromosomal Location of cDNA Clones, Identified from an Enriched Adult Human Retina Library
Author Affiliations
  • Srish Sinha
    From the Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; the Departments of
  • Ashish Sharma
    Ophthalmology and
  • Neeraj Agarwal
    Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of North Texas, Fort Worth, TX.
  • Anand Swaroop
    Ophthalmology and
    Human Genetics, W. K. Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and the
  • Teresa L. Yang–Feng
    From the Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; the Departments of
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 2000, Vol.41, 24-28. doi:
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      Srish Sinha, Ashish Sharma, Neeraj Agarwal, Anand Swaroop, Teresa L. Yang–Feng; Expression Profile and Chromosomal Location of cDNA Clones, Identified from an Enriched Adult Human Retina Library. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2000;41(1):24-28.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

purpose. To delineate the profile of genes expressed in the adult human retina and assign chromosomal location of cDNA clones.

methods. The end-sequence of random clones from an enriched human retinal cDNA library was analyzed by NCBI database search. Expression profile was established by northern blot analysis, database search, or both. Selected cDNA clones were localized to human chromosomes by somatic cell hybrid analysis, in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes, or both. Chromosomal location was also obtained by searching the databases.

results. One hundred and thirty-seven clones were isolated from the subtracted retinal library. Fifty-one clones were identical with 35 known human genes in GenBank, and 24 clones corresponded to 23 uncharacterized human expressed sequenced tags (ESTs), novel genes, or both. The remaining 59 clones were not pursued further because they contained bacterial sequences or repetitive elements. Several clones indicated a restricted pattern of expression with high levels of transcripts in the retina. Chromosomal location of novel retinal ESTs is also reported.

conclusions. This study provides a profile of genes expressed in the adult human retina. One round of subtraction eliminated most constitutively expressed genes and permitted partial normalization of the retinal library. Twenty-three novel genes were identified. The combined information obtained from expression analysis and chromosomal localization of retinal cDNAs should be valuable in identifying candidate genes for diseases involving retinal dysfunction.

Retinal and macular diseases are a major cause of blindness and comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group. The database Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) 1 lists more than 200 diseases that include some form of retinal dystrophy. Mutations in more than 50 genes and/or loci have been implicated in photoreceptor degeneration 2 ; however, the disease-causing mutations have been identified in only 5% to 10% of affected families. As part of the Human Genome Project, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are being generated from random cDNA clones derived from human tissues. 3 Chromosomal location of 30,000 ESTs was reported in 1998, 4 and many more are continuously being mapped. Chromosomal location of retinal genes, together with their expression patterns, can assist in selecting candidate genes for mapped disease loci. We had previously described novel ESTs from an enriched retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line library and reported chromosomal location of 15 genes. 5 Sequence tags have recently been reported from retinal clones as well. 6 7 We had enriched a human retinal cDNA library for specific genes by subtraction against a lymphoblastoid cell line. 8 We report here expression profile and chromosomal location of ESTs from this subtracted library. 
Materials and Methods
cDNA Clones
An adult human retinal cDNA library was enriched for specific genes against a JY lymphoblastoid cell line library by one round of subtraction. 8 To generate ESTs, randomly isolated cDNA clones were sequenced with T3 and T7 primers using a Sequenase kit (US Biochemicals). An average of 200 to 300 bp of sequence obtained from the 3′ and/or 5′ ends was compared with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases (including GenBank, UniGene, and dbEST). 9 Novel retinal sequence tags have been submitted to dbEST. 
Expression Analysis
32P-labeled cDNA probes were hybridized to northern blots of total RNA from baboon and/or human tissues. Human tissues used for RNA preparation included retina, cerebellum, testes (obtained from National Disease Research Interchange, Philadelphia), and fetal brain (from David Bick, Genetics and IVF Institute, Fairfax, VA). Baboon tissues used for the preparation of RNA (adrenal gland, brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, pineal gland, retina, retinal pigment epithelium, spleen, and thyroid) were obtained from the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (San Antonio, TX). Northern blots containing polyA+ RNA from human tissues including heart, brain, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas were also purchased from Clontech (Palo Alto, CA). The methods used for RNA purification and northern hybridization are essentially as described. 10  
Chromosomal Localization
cDNA clones were localized to human chromosomes by somatic cell hybrid analysis and/or in situ hybridization, as described previously. 11 12 Mapping panels 1 and 2, consisting of DNA from somatic cell hybrids, were purchased from the NIGMS repository (Camden, NJ). 
Results
A total of 137 cDNA clones were isolated from the subtracted human retinal library. End-sequences of these clones (in pBluescript KS- vector) were obtained and compared with the NCBI databases. The analysis revealed 51 clones representing 35 known human genes (Table 1) and 24 clones that represented 23 novel human ESTs (Table 2) . Sequence from at least one end of 59 subtracted clones was identical with Escherichia coli sequence, and 3 clones showed high homology to repetitive sequences. These clones were eliminated from further study. 
Among the known genes identified in this screen are genes for calcium-regulated proteins (the small subunit of calcium-dependent protease and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, CALMG), GTP-binding proteins (α subunits of Gs and Gy, and RAL-B), transcription factors (Jun D and NRL), and several other biologically interesting genes. The genes forNiemann-Pick C disease protein (NPC1), a breast adenocarcinoma marker (BC-2), and a tumor rejection antigen gp96 (TRA-1) were also among the clones in the subtracted retina library. Only Apoferritin H was represented 6 times. One opsin cDNA was identified. 
The expression pattern of ESTs was deciphered by searching UniGene or dbEST databases. Sixteen (9 novel and 7 known) randomly selected clones were subjected to northern blot analysis. (Because the databases are dynamic, several ESTs that were initially used for northern blot analysis as novel clones have now been included among the known genes; see Table 1 .) Transcripts for the 9 novel cDNAs were present in the retina and/or a few other tissues. However, in most cases, the RNA levels detected in the retina were substantially higher than in any other tissue. Representative northern blot analysis probed with 6 cDNAs (corresponding to 3 known and 3 novel genes) is shown in Figure 1 . One of the cDNAs, AS372, showed preferentially high levels of expression in the retina (data not shown), although this EST was detected in several different libraries (see Table 2 ). It should be noted that the first retinal transcription factor gene, Neural Retina Leucine zipper (NRL), was isolated as a random clone from this subtracted retinal library. 13  
Fourteen cDNA clones (7 of these are novel ESTs and the other 7 are now included among known genes in Table 1 ) were localized to 13 different human chromosomes and/or chromosomal regions by somatic cell hybrid analysis, in situ hybridization, or both (Table 3) . The search of NCBI databases revealed the chromosomal location of an additional 11 novel ESTs, which are included in Table 2
Discussion
A rapid and successful identification of retinal and macular disease genes by positional-candidate strategy is dependent on chromosomal mapping of the genetic loci and availability of candidate retinal genes from respective chromosomal regions. However, genetic mapping of retinal and macular dystrophies has not been associated with a corresponding increase in the number of candidate retinal genes. 2 Subtracted cDNA libraries generated from the retina and RPE are enriched for genes that are preferentially and/or abundantly expressed in these tissues. Systematic sequencing and characterization of genes from these libraries would, therefore, broadly reflect the profile of genes expressed in the retina and RPE. 
The enriched retinal library, which was used in this study for the isolation of retinal ESTs, was generated by one round of subtraction against a lymphoblastoid cell line to reduce the presence of abundant constitutively expressed genes and to provide a level of normalization. The goal was not to eliminate neuronal and other genes that may be important for normal retinal function, because mutations in such genes can also lead to retinal diseases. Sequence analysis of random cDNA clones, presented here, did not reveal abundantly expressed genes (e.g., actin, tubulin) and ribosomal or mitochondrial genes, validating the necessity for subtraction and normalization methods for expression profiling. Highly expressed retinal genes, like opsin, were enriched to a much less extent (approximately threefold) compared with rare transcripts (e.g., IGFBP2). 11 12 The fact that 51 clones belonged to 35 genes is a testimonial to normalization during subtraction. Most of the phototransduction genes were not identified among subtracted clones, probably because we have characterized only 74 useful ESTs (see Tables 1 and 2 ). 
Although the majority of ESTs identified from the subtracted retinal library are listed among known genes (Table 1) , these data provide valuable information for biological studies. The finding of expression of many calcium-regulated proteins, proteases, and GTP-binding proteins in the retina should help in bridging cellular pathways. It would be particularly interesting to delineate the physiological functions of tumor necrosis factor-1 receptor–associated protein (TRAP2), tumor rejection antigen gp96 (TRA1), and Usurpin-α (a protein involved in cell death attenuation) in the retina and determine their involvement, if any, in retinal degeneration. Similarly, it might be of interest to examine the role of Niemann-Pick C disease protein (NPC1) in the retina. Niemann-Pick C disease is a debilitating lipid storage disorder affecting viscera and central nervous system, and the NPC1 protein is proposed to be involved in intracellular trafficking of sterols and other endocytosed lysosomal cargo. 
Several of the novel ESTs (listed in Table 2 ), although detected in other tissues, reveal abundant expression in the retina. Further studies are in progress on one of the ESTs (AS203/AS372), which encodes a transcription factor of basic helix–loop–helix family (data not shown). This cDNA insert identifies two transcripts of 4 and 9 kb; of these, the 9-kb transcript appears to be detected only in the retinal RNA (data not shown). 
Chromosomal and regional assignment of retinal ESTs provide a new dimension to expression profiling efforts and are valuable for candidate gene identification for retinal diseases. Chromosomal location of a total of 18 novel retinal ESTs is reported here. Several of these map in chromosomal regions of retinal disease loci. 2 Nine retinal cDNAs, which we mapped (shown in Table 3 ), were also localized independently. 4 Except for one cDNA, AS324, 8 clones/ESTs were mapped to similar chromosomal regions in the two studies. Using in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosome spreads, we mapped AS324 to 3q13.3 (Table 3) , whereas this EST was localized to chromosome 19 by radiation hybrid mapping (see Table 2 ). In our in situ hybridization experiments, the most significant labeling was present at 3q13.3, although higher than background grains were observed on chromosome 19q as well. This suggests that AS324 might belong to a gene family. 
Additional research is needed to generate a comprehensive profile of genes expressed in the retina and RPE and during development and aging. The studies reported here and those published recently 5 6 7 14 15 16 provide a comprehensive reference point and an important resource of cloned “retina-expressed genes” that can be used for biological and functional investigations. Expression and chromosomal localization of retinal ESTs should facilitate identification of mutations that result in or contribute to retinal and macular diseases. 
 
Table 1.
 
Similarity of Retinal cDNAs to Previously Characterized Human Genes
Table 1.
 
Similarity of Retinal cDNAs to Previously Characterized Human Genes
Human Gene Accession No. Redundancy
Aldolase C (brain-specific isoform) X05196 1
Apoferritin H M14211 6
Apolipoprotein E M10065 3
BC-2 (breast adenocarcinoma marker) AF042384 1
Calcium-dependent protease (small subunit) X04106 1
Calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAMLG) U18242 1
Carboxypeptidase E X51405 1
Casper, Usurpin-α AF010127, AF015450 1
Creatine kinase B (brain-specific isoform) M16364 3
FTP-3 (BTK region) U01923 1
Gs-GTP binding protein, α subunit X56009, M21139 3
Gy-GTP binding protein, α subunit M69013 1
IGF binding protein 2 M35410 1
Jun D X56681 1
KIAA0531, kinesin heavy chain AB011103 1
KIAA0142, myosin heavy chain 1b D63476 1
NF-IL6-β M83667 1
Niemann-Pick C disease protein (NPC1) AF002020 1
Neural Retina Leucine Zipper (NRL) M81840 3
Opsin K02281 1
Platelet glycoprotein 1b, β chain U59632 2
RALB-GTP binding protein M35416 1
Ribosome-associated membrane protein, RAMP4 AF100470 1
Ribosomal DNA complete repeating unit U13369 1
Sam-68–like phosphotyrosine protein-α AF051321 1
Serine protease with IGF-binding motif Y07921 1
SM22-α D17409 1
Spectrin-β (SPTBN1) M96803 1
SWI/SNF complex 155-kDa subunit (BAF155) U66615 1
Thyroid hormone binding protein, cytosolic (TCB) M26252 1
TNF-1 receptor associated protein (TRAP2) U12596 1
Transferrin S95936 1
Tumor rejection antigen gp96 (TRA1) X15187 1
TTF-1 interacting peptide 20 (TTF-1 IP20) AF000560 2
Ubiquitin conjugating enzyme L22005 2
Table 2.
 
Similarity of Retinal Genes to Novel Human ESTs
Table 2.
 
Similarity of Retinal Genes to Novel Human ESTs
Clone (Accn. No.) Expression* Chromosome* Homologous EST
AS172 AA835779
AS184 (T82288) Eye, brain, prostate 1 H23713
AS186 (T82289) Eye, testis, thyroid 14 AA610175
AS197 Esophagus, germ cell AA928325
AS207 >10 tissues AA815381
AS220 (T82295) <10 tissues including eye 16 AA903454
AS251 (T82296) <10 tissues 17 AA505819
AS267 (T82303) >10 tissues including eye 2, 4 AA604393, AB020693
AS268 (T82304) Eye, muscle F20641
AS269 (T82305) <10 tissues including eye 7 T82820
AS270 >10 tissues including eye 2 AA827304
AS272 (T82306) Eye, heart, placenta, prostate, spleen R36250
AS278 >10 tissues including eye 14 AA610853
AS290 (T82309) >10 tissues including eye 2 H29802
AS298 (T82311) <10 tissues 17 R45025
AS319 (T82322) Eye, CNS, germ cell, ovary X AI368788
AS322 (T82323) >10 tissues including eye 11 AI243569
AS324 (T82324) >10 tissues including eye 19 U79287
AS325 (T82325) Eye 12 AI220029
AS327 (T82326) Eye, brain, lung, ovary, embryo 7 AA167385
AS342 (T82330)
AS345 (T82331) Eye, heart, lung, ovary 2 AA953717
AS203/AS372 (T82335) >10 tissues 12 R87362
Figure 1.
 
Representative results of northern blot analysis of total RNA from baboon tissues, probed with random cDNAs isolated from the subtracted retinal library. Names of tissues are shown above each lane. Ribosomal RNA markers (28s and 18s) are indicated on the left of each blot. (A) demonstrates hybridization to a 32[P]-labeled retinal cDNA probe. (B) shows hybridization to the cDNA probe for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which was used as a control for integrity and loading of RNA. The cDNA probes, used for the blots shown here, are as follows: I, AS220 (novel clone); II, AS260 (KIAA0142, myosin heavy chain 1b); III, AS285 (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, CAMLG); IV, AS306 (TNF-1 receptor associated protein, TRAP2); V, AS324 (novel cDNA); and VI, AS345 (novel cDNA).
Figure 1.
 
Representative results of northern blot analysis of total RNA from baboon tissues, probed with random cDNAs isolated from the subtracted retinal library. Names of tissues are shown above each lane. Ribosomal RNA markers (28s and 18s) are indicated on the left of each blot. (A) demonstrates hybridization to a 32[P]-labeled retinal cDNA probe. (B) shows hybridization to the cDNA probe for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which was used as a control for integrity and loading of RNA. The cDNA probes, used for the blots shown here, are as follows: I, AS220 (novel clone); II, AS260 (KIAA0142, myosin heavy chain 1b); III, AS285 (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, CAMLG); IV, AS306 (TNF-1 receptor associated protein, TRAP2); V, AS324 (novel cDNA); and VI, AS345 (novel cDNA).
Table 3.
 
Chromosomal Localization of cDNAs from the Subtracted Retina Library
Table 3.
 
Chromosomal Localization of cDNAs from the Subtracted Retina Library
Clone No. Genbank No. GDB No. Map Position Specific Labeling % (* )
AS342 T82330 D1S3618 1q43–q44 17.5 (18/103)
AS345 T82331 D2S2937 2p14–p16 12.6 (17/135)
AS324 T82324 D3S4259 3q13.3 8.4 (9/109)
AS285/CAMLG T82308 D5S2727 5q31.2–q31.3 11.8 (15/127)
AS269 T82305 D7S2968 7q35–q36 16.9 (21/124)
AS194/Ser protease T82292 D10S2424 10
AS322 T82323 D11S4756 11q23–q24 10.6 (11/104)
AS372 T82335 D12S2149 12
AS260/KIAA0142 T82301 D13S1702 13q33–q34 13.8 (13/94)
AS208/TRA1 T82294 D16S3390 16q23–q24 16.6 (15/90)
AS347/TTF-1 IP20 T82333 D17S2164 17
AS298 T82311 D17S2165 17q23–q24 22.6 (31/137)
AS301B/NPC1 T82312 D18S1377 18q11.2 23.1 (34/147)
AS302/BC-2 T82313 D19S1143 19q13 12.4 (13/105)
The authors thank Lisa Plumley, Diane Sills, and Junzhe Xu for technical assistance. 
On-line mendelian inheritance in man (OMIM), http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Omim/.
RetNet, http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/RetNet/disease.htm.
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Swaroop A, Xu J, Agarwal N, Weissman SM. A simple and efficient cDNA library subtraction procedure: isolation of human retina specific cDNA specific clones. Nucleic Acids Res. 1991;19:1954. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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Sambrook J, Fritsch EF, Maniatis T. Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual. 1989; 2nd ed. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press Cold Spring Harbor.
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Agarwal N, Hsieh C–L, Sills D, et al. Sequence analysis, expression and chromosomal localization of a gene, isolated from a subtracted human retina cDNA library, that encodes an insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP2). Exp Eye Res. 1991;52:549–561. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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Sohocki MM, Malone KA, Sullivan LS, Daiger SP. Localization of retina/pineal-expressed sequences: identification of novel candidate genes for inherited retinal disorders. Genomics. 1999;58:29–33. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
den Hollander AI, van Driel MA, de Kok YJM, et al. Isolation and mapping of novel candidate genes for retinal disorders using suppression subtractive hybridization. Genomics. 1999;58:240–249. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Malone K, Sohocki MM, Sullivan LS, Daiger SP. Identifying and mapping novel retina-expressed ESTs from humans. Mol Vis. 1999;5:5.http://www.molvis.org/molvis/v5/p5 [PubMed]
Figure 1.
 
Representative results of northern blot analysis of total RNA from baboon tissues, probed with random cDNAs isolated from the subtracted retinal library. Names of tissues are shown above each lane. Ribosomal RNA markers (28s and 18s) are indicated on the left of each blot. (A) demonstrates hybridization to a 32[P]-labeled retinal cDNA probe. (B) shows hybridization to the cDNA probe for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which was used as a control for integrity and loading of RNA. The cDNA probes, used for the blots shown here, are as follows: I, AS220 (novel clone); II, AS260 (KIAA0142, myosin heavy chain 1b); III, AS285 (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, CAMLG); IV, AS306 (TNF-1 receptor associated protein, TRAP2); V, AS324 (novel cDNA); and VI, AS345 (novel cDNA).
Figure 1.
 
Representative results of northern blot analysis of total RNA from baboon tissues, probed with random cDNAs isolated from the subtracted retinal library. Names of tissues are shown above each lane. Ribosomal RNA markers (28s and 18s) are indicated on the left of each blot. (A) demonstrates hybridization to a 32[P]-labeled retinal cDNA probe. (B) shows hybridization to the cDNA probe for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which was used as a control for integrity and loading of RNA. The cDNA probes, used for the blots shown here, are as follows: I, AS220 (novel clone); II, AS260 (KIAA0142, myosin heavy chain 1b); III, AS285 (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, CAMLG); IV, AS306 (TNF-1 receptor associated protein, TRAP2); V, AS324 (novel cDNA); and VI, AS345 (novel cDNA).
Table 1.
 
Similarity of Retinal cDNAs to Previously Characterized Human Genes
Table 1.
 
Similarity of Retinal cDNAs to Previously Characterized Human Genes
Human Gene Accession No. Redundancy
Aldolase C (brain-specific isoform) X05196 1
Apoferritin H M14211 6
Apolipoprotein E M10065 3
BC-2 (breast adenocarcinoma marker) AF042384 1
Calcium-dependent protease (small subunit) X04106 1
Calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAMLG) U18242 1
Carboxypeptidase E X51405 1
Casper, Usurpin-α AF010127, AF015450 1
Creatine kinase B (brain-specific isoform) M16364 3
FTP-3 (BTK region) U01923 1
Gs-GTP binding protein, α subunit X56009, M21139 3
Gy-GTP binding protein, α subunit M69013 1
IGF binding protein 2 M35410 1
Jun D X56681 1
KIAA0531, kinesin heavy chain AB011103 1
KIAA0142, myosin heavy chain 1b D63476 1
NF-IL6-β M83667 1
Niemann-Pick C disease protein (NPC1) AF002020 1
Neural Retina Leucine Zipper (NRL) M81840 3
Opsin K02281 1
Platelet glycoprotein 1b, β chain U59632 2
RALB-GTP binding protein M35416 1
Ribosome-associated membrane protein, RAMP4 AF100470 1
Ribosomal DNA complete repeating unit U13369 1
Sam-68–like phosphotyrosine protein-α AF051321 1
Serine protease with IGF-binding motif Y07921 1
SM22-α D17409 1
Spectrin-β (SPTBN1) M96803 1
SWI/SNF complex 155-kDa subunit (BAF155) U66615 1
Thyroid hormone binding protein, cytosolic (TCB) M26252 1
TNF-1 receptor associated protein (TRAP2) U12596 1
Transferrin S95936 1
Tumor rejection antigen gp96 (TRA1) X15187 1
TTF-1 interacting peptide 20 (TTF-1 IP20) AF000560 2
Ubiquitin conjugating enzyme L22005 2
Table 2.
 
Similarity of Retinal Genes to Novel Human ESTs
Table 2.
 
Similarity of Retinal Genes to Novel Human ESTs
Clone (Accn. No.) Expression* Chromosome* Homologous EST
AS172 AA835779
AS184 (T82288) Eye, brain, prostate 1 H23713
AS186 (T82289) Eye, testis, thyroid 14 AA610175
AS197 Esophagus, germ cell AA928325
AS207 >10 tissues AA815381
AS220 (T82295) <10 tissues including eye 16 AA903454
AS251 (T82296) <10 tissues 17 AA505819
AS267 (T82303) >10 tissues including eye 2, 4 AA604393, AB020693
AS268 (T82304) Eye, muscle F20641
AS269 (T82305) <10 tissues including eye 7 T82820
AS270 >10 tissues including eye 2 AA827304
AS272 (T82306) Eye, heart, placenta, prostate, spleen R36250
AS278 >10 tissues including eye 14 AA610853
AS290 (T82309) >10 tissues including eye 2 H29802
AS298 (T82311) <10 tissues 17 R45025
AS319 (T82322) Eye, CNS, germ cell, ovary X AI368788
AS322 (T82323) >10 tissues including eye 11 AI243569
AS324 (T82324) >10 tissues including eye 19 U79287
AS325 (T82325) Eye 12 AI220029
AS327 (T82326) Eye, brain, lung, ovary, embryo 7 AA167385
AS342 (T82330)
AS345 (T82331) Eye, heart, lung, ovary 2 AA953717
AS203/AS372 (T82335) >10 tissues 12 R87362
Table 3.
 
Chromosomal Localization of cDNAs from the Subtracted Retina Library
Table 3.
 
Chromosomal Localization of cDNAs from the Subtracted Retina Library
Clone No. Genbank No. GDB No. Map Position Specific Labeling % (* )
AS342 T82330 D1S3618 1q43–q44 17.5 (18/103)
AS345 T82331 D2S2937 2p14–p16 12.6 (17/135)
AS324 T82324 D3S4259 3q13.3 8.4 (9/109)
AS285/CAMLG T82308 D5S2727 5q31.2–q31.3 11.8 (15/127)
AS269 T82305 D7S2968 7q35–q36 16.9 (21/124)
AS194/Ser protease T82292 D10S2424 10
AS322 T82323 D11S4756 11q23–q24 10.6 (11/104)
AS372 T82335 D12S2149 12
AS260/KIAA0142 T82301 D13S1702 13q33–q34 13.8 (13/94)
AS208/TRA1 T82294 D16S3390 16q23–q24 16.6 (15/90)
AS347/TTF-1 IP20 T82333 D17S2164 17
AS298 T82311 D17S2165 17q23–q24 22.6 (31/137)
AS301B/NPC1 T82312 D18S1377 18q11.2 23.1 (34/147)
AS302/BC-2 T82313 D19S1143 19q13 12.4 (13/105)
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