October 1966
Volume 5, Issue 5
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Articles  |   October 1966
Visual Functions in Congenital Night Blindness
Author Affiliations
  • R. E. CARR
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York University Medical Center New York, N. Y.
  • H. RIPPS
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York University Medical Center New York, N. Y.
  • I. M. SIEGEL
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York University Medical Center New York, N. Y.
  • R. A. WEALE
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York University Medical Center New York, N. Y.; Department of Physiological Optics, Institute of Ophthalmology, Judd Street, London, W. C. l.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1966, Vol.5, 508-514. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      R. E. CARR, H. RIPPS, I. M. SIEGEL, R. A. WEALE; Visual Functions in Congenital Night Blindness. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1966;5(5):508-514.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

It was shown preciously that the physiological basis of congenital night blindness probably involves a defect in neural transmission affecting primarily the scotopic (rod) mechanism. However, spectral sensitivity measurements in the dark-adapted peripheral retina indicate that rod signals, although greatly attenuated, may reach cortical centers. In spite of the decreased sensitivity, measurements of visual threshold as a function of stimulus area showed that the integrative properties of the retina were normal. Although toe have been unable to identify the precise nature of thedefect, it appears that the abnormality affects both rod and cone vision and extends also over therod-free region of the fovea

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