October 1969
Volume 8, Issue 5
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Articles  |   October 1969
Experimental Corneal Calcification in Animals Treated with Dihydrotachysterol
Author Affiliations
  • JIŔI Obenberger
    Department of Ophthalmology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, N. Y.; Visiting Fellow, supported by National Institutes of Health Grant No. NB 04968-04. Present address: Ophthalmologic Laboratory of Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Praha 2, U nemocnice 2, Czechoslovakia
  • DAVID E. OCUMPAUGH
    Department of Ophthalmology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, N. Y.; National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow
  • MARGARET G. CUBBERLY
    Department of Ophthalmology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, N. Y.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1969, Vol.8, 467-474. doi:
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      JIŔI Obenberger, DAVID E. OCUMPAUGH, MARGARET G. CUBBERLY; Experimental Corneal Calcification in Animals Treated with Dihydrotachysterol. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1969;8(5):467-474.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Several methods of producing calcification of the cornea in experimental animah are presented. Experimental corneal calcification resulted from a combination of treatment with dihydrotachysterol (DHT) and corneal injury. In rabbits, six varieties of corneal injuries were inflicted: de-epithelization of the entire or central part of the cornea, abrasion of the central posterior surface, a combination of these procedures, freezing, and intracameral injection of potassium permanganate. Freezing the central cornea was the simplest and most effective process for the rabbit. In the rat, de-epithelization of either the entire or central cornea proved most effective of the methods employed. In both species, calcification occurred within one week and was always found just beneath the corneal epithelium. Treatment with DHT roved necessary for mineralization, no matter what the operational procedure. The presence of calcium deposits in tissue sections was demonstrated by von Kossa's histochemical method and 45Ca autoradiography. Moderate calcification persisted for many months. Larger subepithelial plaques provoked vascularization and rapid disappearance of the calcium deposits. The procedures employed are discussed in terms of their possible usefulness in future studies of corneal and other soft tissue calcification. A possible role of fibre-blasts is suggested.

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