October 1969
Volume 8, Issue 5
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Articles  |   October 1969
Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) Infection in Rabbit Eye: Role of Antibody and Interferon
Author Affiliations
  • RALPH POLLIKOFF
    Virus Laboratory at Wills Eye Research Institute, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 19130
  • ANTHONY DIPUPPO
    Virus Laboratory at Wills Eye Research Institute, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 19130
  • PATRICIA CANNAVALE
    Virus Laboratory at Wills Eye Research Institute, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 19130
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1969, Vol.8, 488-496. doi:
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      RALPH POLLIKOFF, ANTHONY DIPUPPO, PATRICIA CANNAVALE; Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) Infection in Rabbit Eye: Role of Antibody and Interferon. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1969;8(5):488-496.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The effect of VSV infection in rabbit eye toas investigated. The findings indicated that maximum virus growth in the rabbit cornea coincided with peak keratitis on postinfection day 1. Thereafter, keratitis was generally not observed, whereas infectious virus was detected in the cornea through day 6. Primary virus infection in the cornea of one eye produced serum-neutralizing antibody which did not protect the contralateral control cornea against an initial infection with homologous virus. Virus infection in the cornea did not spread to other segments of the eye and produced resistance in that cornea to reinfection with homologous but not heterologous virus. Resistance to reinfection of the cornea was correlated with presence of a virus-neutralizing substance. The data also suggested that resistance to or recovery from VSV infection in the cornea might be mediated by inducers of interferon, e.g., bacterial endotoxin (S. marcescens), statolon (Penicillium stoloniferum), and complexed polynucleotide RNA (polycytidylic: polyinosinic acids).

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