October 1969
Volume 8, Issue 5
Free
Articles  |   October 1969
The Human Electroretinogram and Occipital Potential in Response to Focal Illumination of the Retina
Author Affiliations
  • JERRY H. JACOBSON
    Department of Ophthalmology, Cornell University Medical College, New York, N. Y.
  • KAZUO KAWASAKI
    Department of Ophthalmology, Cornell University Medical College, New York, N. Y.; Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Kanazawa, Japan
  • TATSUO HIROSE
    Department of Ophthalmology, Cornell University Medical College, New York, N. Y.; Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Kanazawa, Japan
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1969, Vol.8, 545-556. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      JERRY H. JACOBSON, KAZUO KAWASAKI, TATSUO HIROSE; The Human Electroretinogram and Occipital Potential in Response to Focal Illumination of the Retina. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1969;8(5):545-556.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Electrical responses to light stimuli of 1° angular subtense were recorded from the eye (electroretinogram, ERG) and from the occiput (visual evoked response, VER) in normal subjects and in patients with visual field defects. Suitable combinations of stimulus and background intensities were able to produce focal retinal stimulation, evidenced by absence of response to blind spot stimulation and by presence of a clear response with foveal stimulation. At a constant level of background light the range of stimulus intensity necessary to effect focal stimulation was much more critical in ERG (1 log unit) than in VER (4 log units). With these parameters, the distribution of VER amplitude on the horizontal meridian of the visual field showed augmentation at the macular area of the retina in the photopic and scotopic state. When the stimulus was moved from the center to the periphery along the horizontal meridian, the b-wave of the ERG diminished in most cases more greatly than the a-wave, and was reduced to a prolonged negative wave at the periphery. Under these conditions, combined recording of ERG and VER was found to be significant in fudging whether field defects resulted from local disorders of the retina or from lesions higher in the visual sijstem.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×