February 1970
Volume 9, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   February 1970
Histochemical Changes in Lens Epithelium of Rabbits After X-Irradiation
Author Affiliations
  • R. D. RICHARDS
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md
  • S. S. SCHOCKET
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md
  • M. MICHAELIS
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1970, Vol.9, 116-121. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      R. D. RICHARDS, S. S. SCHOCKET, M. MICHAELIS; Histochemical Changes in Lens Epithelium of Rabbits After X-Irradiation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1970;9(2):116-121.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Acid phosphatase and ubiquinone reactions have a different distribution in the lens epithelium of the normal rabbit. Acid phosphatase is more concentrated in the germinative area than the central area, and ubiquinone is quite evenly distributed in the entire lens epithelium. Exposure to a cataractogenic dose of x-ray causes a greater decrease in the acid phosphatase in the germinative zone than in the central zone. Part of the decrease may be due to loss of cells in this area, but at least half of the loss seems to be due to a decrease in acid phosphatase in the remaining cells. This is first noted at 14 days after exposure. Ubiquinone does not show any decrease to 35 days after exposure, and a slight decrease in the germinative zone at 60 days after exposure. The difference in distribution in the control lens, and the effect of x-radiation suggest that the two systems have different functions.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×