September 1970
Volume 9, Issue 9
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Articles  |   September 1970
Myo-Inositol: Active Transport by the Crystalline Lens
Author Affiliations
  • EDWARD COTLIER
    Department of Ophthalmology, and the Oscar Johnson Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo.; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois, Medical College, Chicago, Ill.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 1970, Vol.9, 681-691. doi:
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      EDWARD COTLIER; Myo-Inositol: Active Transport by the Crystalline Lens. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1970;9(9):681-691.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

14C myo-inositol was actively transported into rabbit crystalline lenses incubated in Tyrode's medium. The lens/media accumulation ratios of 14C myo-inositol reached values of 10 to 12 after 24 hr., in vitro incubations. The active transport of 14C myo-inositol into the lens was markedly decreased by metabolic inhibitors of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, and by ouabain, or by an absence of Na+ ions in the incubation media. Kinetic studies revealed a Km of 0.07 mM. per liter for myo-inositol transport into lens. The efflux of 14C myo-inositol from preloaded lenses was slow, but it increased by iodoacetate. Gas chromatography determinations of myo-inositol in the lens and intraocular fluids were as follows (averages in mM. per kilogram of water): lens, 8835; anterior chamber aqueous humor, 135.1; posterior chamber aqueous humor, 93.2; vitreous humor, 235.5; and serum, 40.9. The studies support the concept of active transport and slow efflux of myo-inositol into the lens, as well as the presence of transport mechanisms specific for cyclic alcohols in tissues.

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