June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Endophthalmitis Caused by Streptococcal Species
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen Weiss
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Ajay Kuriyan
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Harry Flynn
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Darlene Miller
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Kathleen Weiss, None; Ajay Kuriyan, None; Harry Flynn, None; Darlene Miller, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 1109. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Kathleen Weiss, Ajay Kuriyan, Harry Flynn, Darlene Miller; Endophthalmitis Caused by Streptococcal Species. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):1109.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: To describe the clinical features, antibiotic sensitivities, and outcomes of endophthalmitis caused by Streptococcus species.

Methods: Retrospective case series of 38 patients with culture-proven endophthalmitis caused by Streptococcus species from 1/1/00 to 7/8/11.

Results: The most common Streptococcal species in our study was S. viridans (76.9%), followed by S. pneumoniae (15.4%), miscellaneous Streptococcus species (5.1%), and Group B Streptococcus (GBS, 2.6%). The clinical settings included acute post-cataract (31.6%), post-intravitreal (IV) injection (28.9%), bleb-related (21.1%), trauma (7.9%), penetrating keratoplasty-related (7.9%), and endogenous infections (2.6%). The most common presenting visual acuity (VA) was light perception (LP, 56.8%), followed by hand motion (HM, 29.7%) and ≥4/200 (13.5%). Initial treatment included IV antibiotics (76.3%), pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with IV antibiotics (21.1%), and evisceration (2.6%). In patients initially treated with IV antibiotics, 34.5% required subsequent PPV. Overall, 100% of the streptococcal isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and levofloxacin, while 89.5% were sensitive to ceftazidime. Lower rates of sensitivity to ceftazidime were found in the S. pneumoniae (75%) and S. viridans (92.3%) than GBS (0%) and miscellaneous (0%) isolates. At 1-month follow-up, enucleation or evisceration was performed in 20.6% of patients; of the remaining patients, the VA outcomes were the following: ≥20/400 (37%), 1 to 4/200 (14.8%), HM to LP (33.3%), and no light perception (NLP, 14.8%).

Conclusions: In the current study of endophthalmitis caused by Streptococcus, the most common isolate was S.viridans and the most common clinical setting was post-cataract surgery. All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and levofloxacin and the majority of isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime. Endophthalmitis caused by Streptococcus generally resulted in poor VA outcomes.

Keywords: 513 endophthalmitis • 422 antibiotics/antifungals/antiparasitics • 433 bacterial disease  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×