June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Biosafety of chitosan and collagen vitrigel membranes in the corneal endothelium of young New Zealand Rabbits
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Guillermo Mendoza
    Ophthalmology Research Chair, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
  • Judith Zavala
    Ophthalmology Research Chair, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
  • Marcos Garza-Madrid
    Ophthalmology Research Chair, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
    Translational Tissue Engineering Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Alejandro Tamez
    Ophthalmology Research Chair, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
  • Angel Zavala-Pompa
    Ophthalmology Research Chair, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
  • Gabriela Brito
    Cátedra de Dispositivos Biomédicos, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
  • Jorge Cortés_Ramirez
    Cátedra de Dispositivos Biomédicos, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
  • Jorge Valdez
    Ophthalmology Research Chair, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
  • Jennifer Elisseeff
    Translational Tissue Engineering Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Guillermo Mendoza, None; Judith Zavala, None; Marcos Garza-Madrid, None; Alejandro Tamez, None; Angel Zavala-Pompa, None; Gabriela Brito, None; Jorge Cortés_Ramirez, IMPI (P); Jorge Valdez, None; Jennifer Elisseeff, Collagen Vitrigel (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 1666. doi:
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      Guillermo Mendoza, Judith Zavala, Marcos Garza-Madrid, Alejandro Tamez, Angel Zavala-Pompa, Gabriela Brito, Jorge Cortés_Ramirez, Jorge Valdez, Jennifer Elisseeff, ; Biosafety of chitosan and collagen vitrigel membranes in the corneal endothelium of young New Zealand Rabbits. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):1666.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To compare the biosafety of chitosan and collagen vitrigel membranes as scaffolds in corneal endothelium bioengineering.

 
Methods
 

Six 3 mo New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized and central corneal endothelium damage was induced in both eyes by using a cryoprobe. Seven mm diameter biomembranes were introduced in one eye through a peripheral corneal port. The contralateral eye was used as control. Four rabbits received chitosan biomembranes and two rabbits received collagen vitrigels. Animals were sacrificed after one week. Both corneas were excised and preserved in 10% formalin for histopathologic analysis with H&E staining.

 
Results
 

The rabbits receiving chitosan-based biomembranes developed sclerocorneal-limbus vascular congestion, corneal opacity, and purulent exudates in the 48 h post-implant. On gross examination, white and friable matter of 2-3mm diameter was observed partially occupying the anterior chamber. Microscopic analysis showed a profuse and abundant inflammatory process (exudative phase) around the biomembrane, mainly composed of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, piocytes, cellular debris, and macrophages. The corneas were invaded by this inflammatory process, with thickening caused by polymorphonuclear infiltrates, edema and fragments of karyorrhexis. The corneas of rabbits treated with collagen-based biomembranes remained transparent and showed no changes after one week. Microscopic examination showed little signs of surgical manipulation and no inflammatory alterations. The control eyes retain their transparency and developed neither macroscopic alterations nor histological inflammation.

 
Conclusions
 

Chitosan-based biomembranes are not suitable for in vivo corneal endothelial bioengineering. Collagen vitrigels allowed damaged corneas of young rabbits to retain their transparent quality with no further complications. Collagen vitrigels are biocompatible and good candidates as scaffolds for corneal endothelial cell transplantation.

 
 
Rabbit corneas implanted with biomembranes. (A) Chitosan membrane caused purulent exudate, vascular congestion, and corneal opacity. (B) Collagen vitrigel remained transparent.
 
Rabbit corneas implanted with biomembranes. (A) Chitosan membrane caused purulent exudate, vascular congestion, and corneal opacity. (B) Collagen vitrigel remained transparent.
 
 
The control (A) and Vitrigel (B) biomambrane implanted eyes retained transparency with no histological inflammation. Eyes implanted with Chitosan biomembrane (C), developed inflammatory exudative phase process around the biomembrane and corneal thickening.
 
The control (A) and Vitrigel (B) biomambrane implanted eyes retained transparency with no histological inflammation. Eyes implanted with Chitosan biomembrane (C), developed inflammatory exudative phase process around the biomembrane and corneal thickening.
 
Keywords: 481 cornea: endothelium  
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