June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Face Detection using the Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paulo Stanga
    Manchester Vision Regeneration (MVR) Lab, Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom
    Manchester Academic Health Science Centre and Centre for Ophthalmology and Vision Research, Institute of Human Development, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Jose Sahel
    CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, INSERM-DHOS CIC 503, Paris, France
    Institut de la Vision, CNRS, UMR_7210, Paris, France
  • Saddek Mohand-Said
    CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, INSERM-DHOS CIC 503, Paris, France
    Institut de la Vision, CNRS, UMR_7210, Paris, France
  • Lyndon daCruz
    Moorfields Eye Hospital, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Avi Caspi
    Second Sight Medical Products, Inc, Sylmar, CA
  • Francesco Merlini
    Second Sight Medical Products, Inc, Sylmar, CA
  • Robert Greenberg
    Second Sight Medical Products, Inc, Sylmar, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Paulo Stanga, OPTOS PLC (F), OPTOS PLC (C), OPTOS PLC (R), TOPCON CORP (F), TOPCON CORP (C), TOPCON CORP (R), SECOND SIGHT (F), SECOND SIGHT (R); Jose Sahel, UPMC/Essilor (P), Second Sight (F); Saddek Mohand-Said, None; Lyndon daCruz, Second Sight Medical products Inc. (R); Avi Caspi, Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. (C), Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. (P); Francesco Merlini, Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. (P); Robert Greenberg, Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. (I), Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. (E), Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. (P), Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. (S)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 1766. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Paulo Stanga, Jose Sahel, Saddek Mohand-Said, Lyndon daCruz, Avi Caspi, Francesco Merlini, Robert Greenberg, ; Face Detection using the Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):1766.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

1)To investigate whether Argus II subjects can locate human faces with their systems using a facial detection algorithm and 2) whether detection speed improves when field of view that is mapped onto the Argus II implant is changed (i.e. demagnified).

 
Methods
 

To date, more than 50 patients blinded by outer retinal dystrophies received an Argus epi-retinal prosthesis (Second Sight, Sylmar, CA). In normal use, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses gathers visual information. The video is subsampled to match the field of view of the implanted array and processed into 60 pixels that characterize the average brightness of the scene at each electrode location. In the current study, the image of the scene acquired by the video camera was processed using a face detection algorithm, resulting in a visual percept only where a human face was detected by the processor. A printed image of a face at normal size was place at random location on a wall at a distance of 3 meters. A distractor image with equivalent size and brightness was also placed on the wall at the same height. The subject was required to search for the face. In some trials, the image processing algorithm captured a field-of-view that matched the field-of-view of the implanted array (20 degrees diagonally) while in some trials the entire field-of-view of the camera (53 degrees) was captured and “zoomed out” to fit the array. In a second experiment the blind subject was engaged in a conversation with a sighted person, who either faced the subject or turned away at some point during the conversation. The blind subject reported whenever he was unable to detect the location of the face.

 
Results
 

Five patients implanted with the Argus II System were able to find the face 100% of the time with both magnifications. The time to find the target was significantly shorter when using the wider field-of-view. In the “real conversation” task, the blind subject was able to recognize within a few seconds when the other person turned away.

 
Conclusions
 

Face detection in real world, i.e. at 2-3 m distance is a challenging task with a retinal implant. Using a device that takes advantage of external image processing, we can provide face detection functionality to blind patients. This feasibility study demonstrated that image processing algorithms can enable patients to perform daily tasks that are not limited by the resolution or the sensitivity of the array.

  
Keywords: 527 face perception • 607 nanotechnology • 494 degenerations/dystrophies  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×