June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Validation of a Virtual Cataract Surgery Simulator for Simulation-Based Medical Education
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shameema Sikder
    Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • Abdullah Alfawaz
    King Khaled Eye Speciality Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Ophthalmology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • Jonathan Song
    Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
    King Khaled Eye Speciality Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • Pat Banerjee
    University of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Cristian Luciano
    University of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Jia Luo
    University of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Patrick Kania
    Immersive Touch, Chicago, IL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Shameema Sikder, None; Abdullah Alfawaz, None; Jonathan Song, None; Pat Banerjee, ImmersiveTouch (E); Cristian Luciano, ImmersiveTouch, Inc. (E); Jia Luo, None; Patrick Kania, ImmersiveTouch (E)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 1821. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Shameema Sikder, Abdullah Alfawaz, Jonathan Song, Pat Banerjee, Cristian Luciano, Jia Luo, Patrick Kania; Validation of a Virtual Cataract Surgery Simulator for Simulation-Based Medical Education. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):1821.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Validate a haptic-enabled virtual reality simulator for the capsulorhexis portion of cataract surgery.

Methods: The MicroVis simulator (Immersive Touch, Chicago, IL) was developed to for cataract surgery virtual reality training. Modules assessing hand-eye coordination as well as simulation of capsulorhexis were completed by 29 Ophthalmology residents in Maryland, USA (14 male, 15 female), 49 ophthalmology residents in Riyadh Saudi Arabia (37 male, 12 female) and 8 US Ophthalmology faculty (3 male, 5 female). Circularity, accuracy and fluency of the capsulorhexis creation as well as dexterity were measured.

Results: US male residents performed better than female residents in terms of overall score for capsulorhexis (p=0.049). Saudi female residents performed slightly better than male in terms of overall score (p=0.12). There was no noticeable difference in overall score among US PGY 2, 3 and 4 residents. Saudi PGY2 residents did slightly better than PGY3 and PGY4 residents. US residents performed better than Saudi residents in all categories with the exception of fluency. The best overall score was obtained by a faculty member.

Conclusions: Virtual reality simulation can be a method for training and assessment in cataract surgery. Regional differences in surgical education may affect baseline scores. Concurrent validation is required by correlating surgical performance with simulator performance as well as the impact of repeated simulator use on surgical skill remain to be studied.

Keywords: 445 cataract  
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