June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Increased Lens Opacities Associated with the Use of Topical Atropine for Myopia Retardation in Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Francine Yang
    Ophthalmology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
  • Fong Yee Foo
    Ophthalmology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
  • Seo Wei Leo
    Ophthalmology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
    Dr Leo Adult and Paediatric Eye Specialist Pte Ltd, Singapore, Singapore
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Francine Yang, None; Fong Yee Foo, None; Seo Wei Leo, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 1910. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Francine Yang, Fong Yee Foo, Seo Wei Leo; Increased Lens Opacities Associated with the Use of Topical Atropine for Myopia Retardation in Children. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):1910.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To describe the clinical effects of atropine eye drops for myopia retardation in rapid progressors

 
Methods
 

Retrospective review of 36 eyes of 18 children who were treated with atropine for myopia retardation. 28 eyes received topical atropine 1% while 8 eyes received atropine 0.5%. All children were prescribed photochromatic progressive addition lenses. Data collected included demographic data, yearly measurements of axial length, spherical equivalent based on cycloplegic refraction and the presence of lens opacities.

 
Results
 

The mean age was 8.8 ± SD 2.2 years. 61.1% of the patients were female and 38.9% were male. Patients were predominantly Chinese (94.4%), reflecting the demographics of the local population. 66.7% had a positive family history of myopia and 22.2% had a positive family history of retinal detachment. Before treatment, baseline myopia progression was -2.04D/year, with a mean axial length (AL) of 25.12mm and mean spherical equivalent (SE) of -4.77D. After the first year of treatment, mean AL and mean SE were 25.15mm and -4.86D respectively. After 2 years, the mean AL was 25.42mm with a mean SE of -5.4D. Myopia progression was significantly reduced to -0.09D/year (p<0.001) and -0.43D/year (p<0.001) after 1 year and 2 years of treatment respectively. Peripheral lens opacities were present in 5.6% of eyes before treatment; this significantly increased to 13.9% of eyes after 1 year (p=0.049), and 22.2% of eyes after 2 years of treatment (p<0.001). However, none were visually significant. There were no other reported systemic or local adverse effects such as allergic conjunctivitis or ocular irritation.

 
Conclusions
 

Topical atropine significantly reduced the rate of progression of myopia but an increase in the presence of peripheral lens opacities was noted following treatment, highlighting the need for careful monitoring.

 
Keywords: 605 myopia  
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