June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Adaptive optics imaging of diabetic retinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan Benesty
    Ophthalmology, Ctr Hosp des Quinze-Vingts, Paris, France
    Clinical Investigation Center 0503, INSERM, Paris, France
  • Sarah Ayello-Scheer
    Ophthalmology, Ctr Hosp des Quinze-Vingts, Paris, France
    Clinical Investigation Center 0503, INSERM, Paris, France
  • Jose Sahel
    Ophthalmology, Ctr Hosp des Quinze-Vingts, Paris, France
    Clinical Investigation Center 0503, INSERM, Paris, France
  • Michel Paques
    Ophthalmology, Ctr Hosp des Quinze-Vingts, Paris, France
    Clinical Investigation Center 0503, INSERM, Paris, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jonathan Benesty, None; Sarah Ayello-Scheer, None; Jose Sahel, UPMC/Essilor (P), Second Sight (F); Michel Paques, MerckSerono (C), Roche (C), Sanofi (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 203. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Jonathan Benesty, Sarah Ayello-Scheer, Jose Sahel, Michel Paques; Adaptive optics imaging of diabetic retinopathy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):203.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the first cause of visual impairment before 60 years of age. Little is known about the earliest retinal signs of chronic hyperglycemia in humans. Here we analysed by adaptive optics (AO) fundus imaging of microvessels of patients with early DR.

Methods: Images of retinal microvessels in the macula from five patients with minimal DR obtained with an AO flood imaging fundus camera (rtx1, ImagineEye, Orsay, France; field of view of individual images 4x4°) were retrospectively analysed. AO images were compared to fluorescein angiographies.

Results: Microaneurysms were clearly visible under the form of round hyporeflective spots. Parietal structures of microaneurysms were identified in two cases. These microaneurysms were often located within an area of of capillary dilation, i.e. in which the capillary mesh was abnormally visible. Microhemorrhages as small as 20 µm large could be detected,

Conclusions: AO imaging of early stages of DR allows to detect noninvasively early features of DR. AO imaging may therefore improve the understanding of the development of diabetic capillaropathy. Our data suggest that capillary dilation occurs early in the process of DR. AO imaging may thus provide novel biomarkers for clinical management of DR.

Keywords: 499 diabetic retinopathy • 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 552 imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound)  
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