June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Postmortem Imaging of the Posterior Segment of Eyes with Histopathologic Correlation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Timothy Saunders
    University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
  • Patrick Gore
    Lions Eye Institute for Transplant & Research, Tampa, FL
  • Nicholas Sprehe
    Lions Eye Institute for Transplant & Research, Tampa, FL
  • Peter Pavan
    University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
  • Curtis Margo
    University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Timothy Saunders, None; Patrick Gore, None; Nicholas Sprehe, None; Peter Pavan, None; Curtis Margo, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 2313. doi:
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      Timothy Saunders, Patrick Gore, Nicholas Sprehe, Peter Pavan, Curtis Margo; Postmortem Imaging of the Posterior Segment of Eyes with Histopathologic Correlation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):2313.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To describe the correlation of postmortem vitreoretinochoroidal imaging of whole tissue bank eyes by photography and inference tomography with histopathological examination.

 
Methods
 

Whole, unfixed, tissue bank globes were dropped with a solution of 10% phenylephrine and 1% tropicamide, given in two rounds, 3 minutes apart. 20 minutes later the globes were enucleated by standard techniques and kept moist with saline soaked gauze, then placed in a specimen cup and refrigerated in a transport cooler. The tissue was delivered to investigators within 12 hours of the time of death. The globes were oriented and secured to a Styrofoam head. Balanced salt solution in a 1 ml syringe with a 32 gauge needle was injected into the vitreous cavity though a spot 3.5 mm posterior to the limbus, and the eye was titrated to an appropriate pressure by palpation. Photographs and optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were obtained. Eyes were then fixed with 10% formalin. Step sectioning of the maculopapular bundle was performed using standard techniques and histopathologic exam was performed.

 
Results
 

Pupil dilation adequate for fundus photographs and OCT of the maculopapular bundle was achieved after death. Image quality was adequate, for both modalities, though artifact was present. Outer retinal structures were identifiable and demonstrated structural details. Retinal pigment epithelial and choroidal landmarks were easily identifiable. The lumen of large caliber retinal vessels had low reflectivity, appearing dark. Histopathologic evaluation showed good correlations with postmortem imaging.

 
Conclusions
 

Commonly used techniques to image the posterior segment of the eye can be adapted to screen postmortem eyes. Fundus photography and OCT can be employed by researchers to more efficiently screen postmortem eyes for disease-specific conditions.

 
 
Macula scan with enhanced depth imaging (EDI) OCT of a postmortem eye
 
Macula scan with enhanced depth imaging (EDI) OCT of a postmortem eye
 
 
Color fundus photo of the same postmortem eye as shown by OCT
 
Color fundus photo of the same postmortem eye as shown by OCT
 
Keywords: 552 imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • 472 comparative anatomy  
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