June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Non-adherence in glaucoma and its association with satisfaction of glaucoma and medication information
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heidi Cate
    Glaucoma Research Unit, Ophthalmology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Foundation Trust, Norwich, United Kingdom
    School of Pharmacy, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom
  • Debi Bhattacharya
    School of Pharmacy, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom
  • Allan Clark
    Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom
  • Richard Fordham
    Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom
  • Richard Holland
    Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom
  • David Broadway
    Glaucoma Research Unit, Ophthalmology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Foundation Trust, Norwich, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Heidi Cate, None; Debi Bhattacharya, None; Allan Clark, None; Richard Fordham, None; Richard Holland, None; David Broadway, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 2623. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Heidi Cate, Debi Bhattacharya, Allan Clark, Richard Fordham, Richard Holland, David Broadway, ; Non-adherence in glaucoma and its association with satisfaction of glaucoma and medication information. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):2623.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Medication non-adherence can lead to visual field loss, unnecessary additional prescribing and/or intervention. Patient satisfaction with medicines information is associated with improved adherence, however, the relationship between adherence and glaucoma information provision is unclear. The study aimed to determine if patients treated with travoprost were more adherent if satisfied with both medication-related and glaucoma information.

 
Methods
 

Patients newly prescribed travoprost were given a Travalert Dosing Aid® from which 8 months of daily adherence data were collected. The mean % adherence rate for each month was calculated and month 7 and 8 mean % adherence combined. Participants received either standard care (control) or additional medication and glaucoma related information by trained glaucoma support assistants (GSAs) (intervention). Satisfaction with received information (SIMS) was measured at 2 and 8 months for both groups. At 2 months, the intervention group also rated the glaucoma information received from the GSAs.

 
Results
 

208 patients (106 control and 102 intervention) were included. There was no significant difference in adherence between the groups at any time point or at month 7 and 8 combined (p=0.703). There was no correlation between adherence and SIMS score at month 8 for the total cohort (r=-0.015 p=0.883). However, SIMS scores were higher in the intervention group (p<0.001) at months 2 and 8 (Table). More than 80% (n=70) of intervention patients considered the GSA service improved their knowledge of glaucoma (87%), confidence with therapy (85%), and drop administration (87%). There was a positive correlation between satisfaction with glaucoma information received from the GSAs and adherence in the intervention group (r=0.243 p=0.022).

 
Conclusions
 

The mean control adherence rate was higher than expected, which may have contributed to the absence of a demonstrable difference between the two groups. However, intervention participants demonstrated raised satisfaction levels with GSA delivered glaucoma and medication-related information relative to standard care. Although this study did not appear to improve adherence, a GSA service did improve patient satisfaction with medication and glaucoma-related information which may have the potential to improve adherence.

 
 
Comparison of SIMS scores between intervention and control groups at month 2 and month 8.
 
Comparison of SIMS scores between intervention and control groups at month 2 and month 8.
 
Keywords: 466 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled clinical trials • 460 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: health care delivery/economics/manpower • 568 intraocular pressure  
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