June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Dimensional Variation of the Orbicularis Oculi Muscle in Non-preserved, Fresh Frozen Human Cadavers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bryan Costin
    Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Natta Sakolsatayadorn
    Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Stephen McNutt
    Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Tal Rubinstein
    Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • George Trichonas
    Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Jennifer McBride
    Department of Anatomy, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH
  • Julian Perry
    Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Bryan Costin, None; Natta Sakolsatayadorn, None; Stephen McNutt, None; Tal Rubinstein, None; George Trichonas, MEEI-Patent Application U.S. Serial No. 61/327,476 (P); Jennifer McBride, None; Julian Perry, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 3038. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Bryan Costin, Natta Sakolsatayadorn, Stephen McNutt, Tal Rubinstein, George Trichonas, Jennifer McBride, Julian Perry; Dimensional Variation of the Orbicularis Oculi Muscle in Non-preserved, Fresh Frozen Human Cadavers. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):3038.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To investigate polymorphic variation in the dimensions of the orbicularis oculi muscle (OOM) through anatomic dissection of fresh-frozen human cadavers.

 
Methods
 

Skin incisions were created along a line 1 cm lateral and parallel to a line connecting the supraorbital notch (SON) and the infraorbital foramen (IOF) and from the lateral canthus to the superior border of the tragus. The OOM was isolated using a combination of sharp and blunt dissection until each of its distal borders were identified. A metric ruler measured the superior, inferior, and lateral dimensions of the OOM from the orbital rim. Data collection included age at time of death, gender, and race.

 
Results
 

A total of 12 hemifaces from 6 fresh frozen human cadavers were dissected. All specimens were male. Cadavers were of Caucasian (5) and African (1) decent. Average age at time of death was 65.7 years (36 - 84 years). Mean lateral OOM dimension was 2.8 cm (1.7 - 3.3 cm) on the right and 3.1 cm (1.9 - 3.8 cm) on the left. Mean superior dimension was 1.9 cm (1.5 - 2.5 cm) on the right and 1.7 cm (1.1 - 2.2 cm) on the left. Mean inferior dimension was 1.6 cm (0.8 - 2.4 cm) on the right and 1.5 cm (1 - 2 cm) on the left. The average distance from the lateral orbital rim to the superior border of the tragus was 8.1 cm (7.7 - 8.4 cm) on the right and 8.2 cm (7.9 - 8.7 cm) on the left.

 
Conclusions
 

In unpreserved, fresh frozen cadavers, the OOM extends approximately 1.8 cm superiorly from the orbital rim 1 cm lateral to the SON, approximately 1.6 cm inferiorly from the orbital rim 1 cm lateral to the ION, and extends approximately 2.9 cm laterally from the orbital rim at the level of the lateral canthus. Increased knowledge of these dimensions has significant clinical and surgical implications, including more nuanced neurotoxin administration and surgical applications.

     
Keywords: 419 anatomy • 616 neurotransmitters/neurotransmitter systems • 675 receptors: pharmacology/physiology  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×