June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Anterior Chamber Depth and Lens Thickness in African-Americans with Age-Related Long Anterior Zonules
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Roberts
    Clinical Education, Illinois College of Optometry, Chicago, IL
    Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Bruce Teitelbaum
    Clinical Education, Illinois College of Optometry, Chicago, IL
  • David Castells
    Clinical Education, Illinois College of Optometry, Chicago, IL
  • Janis Winters
    Clinical Education, Illinois College of Optometry, Chicago, IL
  • Jacob Wilensky
    Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Daniel Roberts, None; Bruce Teitelbaum, None; David Castells, None; Janis Winters, None; Jacob Wilensky, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 3504. doi:
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      Daniel Roberts, Bruce Teitelbaum, David Castells, Janis Winters, Jacob Wilensky; Anterior Chamber Depth and Lens Thickness in African-Americans with Age-Related Long Anterior Zonules. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):3504.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Long anterior zonules (LAZ) are characterized by zonular fibers that extend more central than usual on the anterior lens capsule. They cause a unique type of pigment dispersion and are associated with female gender, older age, hyperopia, and shorter axial length. Observations have suggested that LAZ may be a risk factor for angle-closure glaucoma, possibly in association with plateau iris configuration. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate anterior chamber depth (ACD) and lens thickness (LT) in LAZ eyes since there is need to further understand ocular dimensions in LAZ eyes.

Methods: The eyes of 50 African-American females with LAZ were compared to 50 controls who were matched on age (+/- 5 yrs), race, sex, and refractive error (+/- 1.00 D). To obtain measurements on the variables of interest, i.e., central ACD and LT, a-scan ultrasonography (CompuScan LT Biometric Ultrasound System, Storz Instrument Co.) was performed in a masked fashion. Right eyes were used for analysis unless inclusion criteria were not met.

Results: Mean age +/- SD (range) of LAZ subjects was 67.1 +/- 7.6 yrs (52-85 yrs) and for controls it was 66.6 +/- 8.5 yrs (48-85 yrs). Mean spherical-equivalent subjective refraction was +1.85 +/- 1.41 D (-1.75 to +4.75 D) for cases and +1.94 +/- 1.31 D (-0.75 to +4.75 D) for controls. Mean ACD for cases was 2.45 +/- 0.34 mm (1.81 to 3.06 mm) and 2.57 +/- 0.38 mm (1.83 to 3.44 mm) for controls. Mean LT for cases was 4.94 +/- 0.43 mm (4.07 to 5.91 mm) and 4.83 +/- 0.45 mm (3.50 to 5.87 mm) for controls. Using conditional logistic regression to control for any residual differences in age and refractive error, no significant differences (P>0.1) were present between LAZ eyes and control eyes relative to ACD and LT.

Conclusions: Our African-American female subjects with LAZ did not exhibit clinically significant differences in central anterior chamber depth and lens thickness as compared to age, sex, and refractive error matched controls.

Keywords: 464 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment • 421 anterior segment • 419 anatomy  
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