June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
An Anterior Chamber Optical Tissue Phantom for AC-OCT
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Temple Rowe
    Rowe Technical Design Inc, Dana Point, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Temple Rowe, Rowe Technical Design, Inc. (E)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 3572. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Temple Rowe; An Anterior Chamber Optical Tissue Phantom for AC-OCT. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):3572.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To develop and test a model eye with a corneal tissue phantom that mimics changes in index of refraction and backscatter coefficients as closely as possible to normal human anatomy. The primary use of such a model is to provide a target to demonstrate capabilities of anterior chamber OCT instruments, as well as Scheimpflug cameras.

 
Methods
 

Three (3) AC model eyes were constructed and tested with a variety of OCT instruments. Values evaluated include central corneal thickness (CCT), and corneal stroma backscatter, two initial key values in the emulation of the human cornea from an OCT perspective. Values were measured by imagery taken from both a laboratory OCT and a commercial instrument.

 
Results
 

On the AC-OCT we tested this with, the CCT was over-reported on average by 6%. Also, stromal backscatter signal in the model corneal did not match well with the backscatter measured from normal human cornea as measured by both the laboratory and commercial OCTs. See Figure 1, attached.

 
Conclusions
 

These initial attempts in emulation of a human cornea for use in demonstrating laboratory and commercial grade AC OCT instruments demonstrate the challenges of obtaining the goal of good tissue emulation. Results show the work necessary to emulate the stroma backscatter more accurately in these models, as well as understand some of the posterior cornea (endothelium) curvature variations from measured normal anatomy.

 
 
Figure 1. Composite image showing AC-OCT B-scans of the central corneas of (A) The AC-OCT model eye with corneal tissue phantom, and (B) a normal human subject cornea. Images were matched to same relative magnification.
 
Figure 1. Composite image showing AC-OCT B-scans of the central corneas of (A) The AC-OCT model eye with corneal tissue phantom, and (B) a normal human subject cornea. Images were matched to same relative magnification.
 
Keywords: 630 optical properties • 552 imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • 479 cornea: clinical science  
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