June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Impact of pupil amplitude apodization on through-focus image quality with spherical aberration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hae Won Jung
    The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
    Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
  • Len Zheleznyak
    The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
    Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
  • Geunyoung Yoon
    The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
    Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Hae Won Jung, None; Len Zheleznyak, None; Geunyoung Yoon, Bausch & Lomb (F), Johnson & Johnson (F), Allergan (C), Staar Surgical (C), CIBA Vision (F), Acufocus (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 4266. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Hae Won Jung, Len Zheleznyak, Geunyoung Yoon; Impact of pupil amplitude apodization on through-focus image quality with spherical aberration. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):4266.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: It has long been known that the Stiles-Crawford effect, the intrinsic pupil amplitude apodization of the eye, is effective for enhancing retinal image quality. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact on through-focus image quality (TFIQ) of manipulating the pupil amplitude apodization function in combination with multifocal presbyopic corrections with spherical aberration (SA).

Methods: TFIQ with SA was evaluated by optical bench testing and visual performance measurements in monochromatic light (550nm). The optical bench system consisted of a model eye with phase-plate induced SA, a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to control pupil apodization, and a camera for imaging a tumbling E letter chart. TFIQ was quantified by calculating the correlation coefficient between a reference image (without SA and apodization) and captured through-focus images (0 to 2.5D with 0.1D step). Pupil apodization was modeled as a Gaussian function with various sigma values (0.5 to 2.0mm). Through-focus visual acuity was measured in 2 cyclopleged subjects at distance, intermediate and near object distances (0, 1 and 2D). Both optical bench testing and visual performance were carried out with ±0.2µm SA over a 4mm artificial pupil.

Results: Introducing Gaussian apodization improved distance image quality, regardless of sign of SA, by 7-12% for sigma ranging from 0.5 to 2.0mm. At intermediate (1D) image quality, the negative SA case had a larger improvement (9-18%) than the positive SA case (7-11%) for sigma ranging 0.5 to 2.0mm. For near (2D), the improvement with negative SA was even larger (14-33%) while positive SA showed no improvement. Visual benefits with apodization were also found. Pupil apodization with sigma=0.5 led to a 1.0, 2.6 and 4.5 line improvement in visual acuity at 0, 1 and 2D, respectively, in the presence of negative SA. For positive SA, visual acuity improved by 1.0, 1.8 and 0.1 lines, respectively.

Conclusions: Pupil amplitude apodization led to a significant improvement in through-focus image quality, especially with negative SA. This finding suggests that halos and glare induced by multifocal presbyopic corrections can be reduced with appropriate pupil amplitude apodization.

Keywords: 653 presbyopia • 626 aberrations • 567 intraocular lens  
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