June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
The global burden of potential productivity loss from presbyopia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Joy
    Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
  • Kevin Frick
    Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
  • Kovin Naidoo
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  • David Wilson
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  • Brien Holden
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Susan Joy, None; Kevin Frick, Center for Applied Value Analysis (C), National Association for Eye and Vision Research (C); Kovin Naidoo, None; David Wilson, None; Brien Holden, Allergan (F), AMO (I)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 4545. doi:
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      Susan Joy, Kevin Frick, Kovin Naidoo, David Wilson, Brien Holden; The global burden of potential productivity loss from presbyopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):4545.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: The onset of presbyopia in middle adulthood results in potential losses in productivity among otherwise healthy adults. This economic burden may be particularly noticeable in lower income countries where up to 94% of cases may be under-corrected or uncorrected. This study estimates the global burden of potential productivity lost due to presbyopia.

Methods: Population data from the US Census Bureau were combined with the estimated prevalence of presbyopia, age of onset, labor force participation rate, employment rate, per capita gross domestic product (GDP) in purchasing power parity units, and presbyopia disability weights to estimate the global loss of productivity due to presbyopia in each country in 2007. We conservatively assumed that only employed people under the age of 50 contribute to the economy. Disability weights ranged from the same as low vision in other studies to approximately 6% of the original disability weight as motivated by the literature and data from the United States.

Results: An estimated 376 million cases of presbyopia worldwide were associated with a potential productivity loss of between 0.06% and 0.99% of global GDP. With different disability weights assigned for corrected and uncorrected cases, an estimated 0.43% of global GDP was lost to presbyopia. Correcting global presbyopia to the level achieved in rich countries could reduce the burden to 0.22% of global GDP.

Conclusions: Even with conservative assumptions around the productive population, presbyopia is likely to be a significant burden on productivity and correction could have a significant impact on productivity in lower income countries.

Keywords: 653 presbyopia • 460 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: health care delivery/economics/manpower  
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