June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Reperfusion of ischemia with central retinal vein occlusion by activated protein C
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Motohiro Kamei
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Univ Grad School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Nagakazu Matsumura
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Univ Grad School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Mihoko Suzuki
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Univ Grad School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Susumu Sakimoto
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Univ Grad School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Hirokazu Sakaguchi
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Univ Grad School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Kohji Nishida
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Univ Grad School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Motohiro Kamei, None; Nagakazu Matsumura, None; Mihoko Suzuki, None; Susumu Sakimoto, None; Hirokazu Sakaguchi, HOYA Corporation (R); Kohji Nishida, Alcon (C), Alcon (F), HOYA (F), Senju (F), Pfizer (F), Santen (F), Osaka University (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 4933. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Motohiro Kamei, Nagakazu Matsumura, Mihoko Suzuki, Susumu Sakimoto, Hirokazu Sakaguchi, Kohji Nishida; Reperfusion of ischemia with central retinal vein occlusion by activated protein C. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):4933.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To present two cases of ischemic central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) in which reperfusion of large ischemic areas occurred after a novel treatment with intraocular activated protein C (APC) injection.

 
Methods
 

We intravitreally injected 3 µg of APC to treat two men (ages, 62 and 60 years) diagnosed with ischemic CRVO. We evaluated the retinal perfusion using fluorescein angiography (FA) before and after treatment. The safety and efficacy of the treatment were evaluated.

 
Results
 

In case 1, fluorescein angiography (FA) showed delayed retinal vascular filling and hypofluorescence due to non-perfusion of the retinal capillaries of 22.4 disc areas (DA). The area of non-perfusion decreased to 9.6 DA (by 57%) 3 months after treatment and completely resolved with almost normal microcirculation 10 months after treatment (Figure). In case 2, FA performed 6 months after treatment showed clearly improved microcirculation with shrinkage of the area of non-perfusion from 52.6 to 6.1 (by 88%). The treatment had no adverse effects and the visual acuity improved in both cases (20/400 to 20/250, and 20/300 to 20/150).

 
Conclusions
 

The current clinical report is the first to show that APC may be a potential treatment to achieve reperfusion of ischemic lesions. Although we reported only two cases, APC may be useful for treating not only ischemic CRVO but also other ischemic disorders such as diabetic retinopathy, acute myocardial infarction, or stroke.

  
 
10 months post-treatment
 
10 months post-treatment
 
Keywords: 749 vascular occlusion/vascular occlusive disease • 436 blood supply • 572 ischemia  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×