June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Cognitive dysfunction reduces vision-specific quality of life in older Asian adults
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peggy Chiang
    Epidemiol, Hlth Services Rsrch, Singapore Eye Research Inst, Singapore, Singapore
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore
  • Charumathi Sabanayagam
    Epidemiol, Hlth Services Rsrch, Singapore Eye Research Inst, Singapore, Singapore
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore
  • Yingfeng Zheng
    Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China
  • Tien Wong
    Epidemiol, Hlth Services Rsrch, Singapore Eye Research Inst, Singapore, Singapore
    Ophthalmology, Department of Ophthalmology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
  • Ecosse Lamoureux
    Epidemiol, Hlth Services Rsrch, Singapore Eye Research Inst, Singapore, Singapore
    Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Peggy Chiang, None; Charumathi Sabanayagam, None; Yingfeng Zheng, None; Tien Wong, Allergan (C), Bayer (C), Novartis (C), Pfizer (C), GSK (F), Roche (F); Ecosse Lamoureux, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 5314. doi:
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      Peggy Chiang, Charumathi Sabanayagam, Yingfeng Zheng, Tien Wong, Ecosse Lamoureux, ; Cognitive dysfunction reduces vision-specific quality of life in older Asian adults. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):5314.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Older persons with vision impairment (VI) are more likely to have cognitive dysfunction (CD). VI impacts on vision-specific quality of life (QoL). However whether CD also impacts negatively on vision-specific QoL remains unclear. We examined the association between CD and vision-specific QoL (vision-specific functioning (VF)).

 
Methods
 

We examined data from Chinese (n=1523), Malay (n=1429), and Indian (n=1350) adults aged 60 years and older who participated in three independent population based studies conducted from 2004-2012 in Singapore. Participants underwent standardized ophthalmic assessments for VI and blindness, defined using presenting visual acuity (PVA) (United States (U.S) definition). Sociodemographic data were recorded using a standardized questionnaire. CD was defined categorically i.e. absence/presence using the locally validated Abbreviated Mental Test and education-based cutoff scores. VF was measured via the psychometrically validated VF-11 questionnaire using Rasch analysis. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between VF and CD, adjusting for presenting vision, major eye diseases, and other covariates.

 
Results
 

Of the 4310 participants (mean±SD age was 68.9±6.0yr; 47.7% were female) examined, 15.5% (666/4310) had CD - Chinese-10.0%, Indians-15.5%, and Malays-21.2%; p<0.001. The overall mean±SD VF score was 4.34±1.59 logits (Chinese 4.69±1.32, Indians 4.21±1.62; Malays 4.09±1.76; p<0.001), indicating a high mean level of functioning for this cohort. In multivariate linear regression models, after adjusting for age, gender, education and literacy levels, income, cardiovascular disease, total cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes, the presence of CD was independently associated with reduced VF (β [beta coefficient] -0.61, 95%CI [confidence interval] -0.76,-0.47; p<0.05) and remained statistically significant after adjusting for unilateral VI (β -0.49, 95%CI-0.63,-0.35; p<0.05); bilateral VI (β -0.43, 95%CI -0.56,-0.29; p<0.05); and eye diseases (β -0.56, 95%CI-0.70,-0.42; p<0.05) in three separate statistical models. In models stratified by ethnicity, the association between CD and VF remained statistically significant among the three ethnic groups.

 
Conclusions
 

Older persons with CD, irrespective of their ethnicity, have reduced VF compared to people who do not have the condition. Preventing CD may contribute to better vision-related QoL.

 
Keywords: 669 quality of life  
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