June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
First implantation of a telemetric, intraocular pressure sensor in patients with glaucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Niklas Plange
    Dept of Ophthalmology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • Antonis Koutsonas
    Dept of Ophthalmology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • Peter Walter
    Dept of Ophthalmology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Niklas Plange, Implandata Ophthalmic Products (F); Antonis Koutsonas, None; Peter Walter, Novartis (R), Bayer (R), Second Sight (R), Bayer (F), Novartis (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 5643. doi:
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      Niklas Plange, Antonis Koutsonas, Peter Walter; First implantation of a telemetric, intraocular pressure sensor in patients with glaucoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):5643.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To investigate safety and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement of a telemetric intraocular pressure sensor in patients with glaucoma.

Methods: 5 patients with glaucoma were included in a prospective single-center clinical trial (follow-up 3 months-1 year). The ring-shaped telemetric IOP sensor (ARGOS, Implandata Ophthalmic Products GmbH, Hannover, Germany) is a miniature device with eight pressure-sensitive capacitors included in a single substrate Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) combined with a circular micro coil antenna. The device is completely encapsulated in silicone rubber with an outside diameter of 11.3 mm. A reader unit uses a high frequency magnetic field for power and data transmission.

Results: The implantation of the telemetric pressure sensor was successfully performed in the ciliary sulcus at the end of a planned cataract surgery with implantation of an intracapsular lens. The sensor was implanted using a 5.5 mm clear corneal incision. Three patients had a significant sterile anterior chamber inflammation 2 days after surgery that resolved 7 days later following intensive anti-inflammatory treatment. In all patients, IOP measurement was successfully performed at all visits. All patients successfully performed home self-tonometry after a short instruction.

Conclusions: Despite an early postoperative anterior chamber inflammation in some patients, the IOP sensor was well tolerated in all patients during follow-up. For the first time, continous IOP monitoring using a non-contact intraocular pressure sensor seems possible in glaucoma patients. The variability of IOP values using the ARGOS sensor compared to Goldmann applanation tonometry has yet to be evaluated.

Keywords: 568 intraocular pressure  
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