June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Gender differences in ocular biometric data
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • yoona jang
    Department of Visual Science, Kitasato University Graduate School, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Hiroshi Uozato
    Department of Visual Science, Kitasato University Graduate School, Sagamihara, Japan
    Ophthoptics and Visual Sciences, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Science, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Takushi Kawamorita
    Department of Visual Science, Kitasato University Graduate School, Sagamihara, Japan
    Ophthoptics and Visual Sciences, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Science, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Yuko Shibata
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kitasato University Graduate School, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships yoona jang, None; Hiroshi Uozato, None; Takushi Kawamorita, None; Yuko Shibata, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 567. doi:
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      yoona jang, Hiroshi Uozato, Takushi Kawamorita, Yuko Shibata; Gender differences in ocular biometric data. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):567.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To compare the differences in ocular biometric data with regard to gender

Methods: Seventy-two eyes from 38 healthy subjects (mean age = 21.4 ± 2.7 years, range: 18 to 31 years) including 19 males (mean age = 22.5 ± 2.6 years) and 19 females (mean age = 20.3 ± 2.5 years) were recruited. Anterior chamber depth (ACD) and axial length (AL) were measured with IOL Master TM (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Jena, Germany). ACD was defined as the length between the center of anterior surface of cornea and the center of anterior lens surface. Angle lambda (kappa), distance from central pupillary eccentricity to thinnest corneal thickness, corneal curvature(CR), corneal power(CP), central corneal thickness(CCT) were measured with pachymetry with a dual scheimpflug imaging system GalileiTM (Ziemer Ophthalmic Systems, Port, Switzerland ). The statistical significance of the gender differences between measurements was evaluated by Student’s t-test.

Results: The mean ACD was 3.77 ± 0.32 mm for males and 3.65 ± 0.25 mm for females. Males had significantly deeper ACD than females (p = 0.049). The mean angle lambda, AL and CCT were 3.15 ± 1.60 °, 25.31 ± 1.59 mm, 552.01 ± 30.05 μm for males and 3.86 ± 1.58 °, 24.79 ± 1.15 mm, 551.81 ± 20.23 μm for females, respectively. Males had significantly larger angle lambda than females (p = 0.028). There was no statistically significant difference in the AL and distance from central pupillary eccentricity to thinnest corneal thickness in gender comparison, but there are tendency associated with differences gender (p = 0.056, p = 0.054). There was no statistically significant difference in mean CR, CP and CCT between males and females.

Conclusions: Both ACD and angle lambda had statistically significant difference with gender. And, AL and distance from central pupillary eccentricity to thinnest corneal thickness were tendency associated with gender difference. However, gender did not show any statistically significant effect on cornea as CR, CP and CCT. Therefore, consider to gender would be an important factor to ocular biometric examinations for refractive and cataract surgeries.

Keywords: 421 anterior segment • 419 anatomy • 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical  
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