June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Inhibition of retinoblastoma tumor progression using catalytic antioxidant naoparticles
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Klump
    Oklahoma Ctr for Neuroscience, Univ of Oklahoma Hlth Sciences Ctr, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Rheal Towner
    Oklahoma Ctr for Neuroscience, Univ of Oklahoma Hlth Sciences Ctr, Oklahoma City, OK
    Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Sudipta Seal
    Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
    Nanoscience and Technology Ctr, University of Central Florida, Orlando, OK
  • Michael Dyer
    Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN
  • James McGinnis
    Oklahoma Ctr for Neuroscience, Univ of Oklahoma Hlth Sciences Ctr, Oklahoma City, OK
    Cell Biology, Ophthalmology, Univ of Oklahoma Hlth Sciences Ctr, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Kathryn Klump, None; Rheal Towner, None; Sudipta Seal, UCF (P); Michael Dyer, None; James McGinnis, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 6107. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Kathryn Klump, Rheal Towner, Sudipta Seal, Michael Dyer, James McGinnis, ; Inhibition of retinoblastoma tumor progression using catalytic antioxidant naoparticles. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):6107.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Retinoblastoma is a malignant tumor of retinal origin arising during development. Tumorigenesis and progression of retinoblastoma is associated with a rise in reactive oxygen species and dependent downstream signaling cascades leading to tumor growth and vascularization. Catalytic antioxidant cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) function as regenerative superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and catalase mimetics. Our published data indicate that nanoceria are potent down regulators of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and neovascularization and our current data support the therapeutic use of nanoceria in a heritable model of retinoblastoma.

Methods: Fundoscopic and magnetic resonance images were obtained from (P53TKO mice, Chx-10-cre; Rb lox/- ; p53 lox/-; p107 -/-) following tumorigenesis. A single dose of nanoceria (172 ng/eye) was delivered into the vitreous at baseline. Follow-up imaging was performed at 1 and 3 weeks post-injection. Tumor size, vascularity, and perfusion were monitored using funduscopy, MRI and fluorescein angiography. Western blot, PCR-Array, and immunocytochemistry were used to evaluate changes in ROS-mediated gene and protein expression.

Results: Histology and fundoscopic imaging demonstrate a significant decrease in tumor burden and invasion of the anterior chamber following treatment with nanoceria.

Conclusions: Nanoceria are novel inhibitors of tumor growth in vivo and may represent a novel vision-sparing therapeutic in the multifaceted approach to the treatment of ocular malignancy.

Keywords: 703 retinoblastoma • 748 vascular endothelial growth factor • 608 nanomedicine  
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