June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Impact of reticular pseudodrusen on macular function
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Giuseppe Querques
    Ophthalmology, University Paris Est Creteil, Cretil, France
  • Nathalie Massamba
    Ophthalmology, University Paris Est Creteil, Cretil, France
  • Mayer Srour
    Ophthalmology, University Paris Est Creteil, Cretil, France
  • Elise Boulanger-Scemama
    Ophthalmology, University Paris Est Creteil, Cretil, France
  • Lea Querques
    Ophthalmology, University Paris Est Creteil, Cretil, France
  • Eric Souied
    Ophthalmology, University Paris Est Creteil, Cretil, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Giuseppe Querques, None; Nathalie Massamba, None; Mayer Srour, None; Elise Boulanger-Scemama, None; Lea Querques, None; Eric Souied, BAUSCH + LOMB (C), NOVARTIS (C), BAYER (C), THEA (C), ALLERGAN (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 6280. doi:
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      Giuseppe Querques, Nathalie Massamba, Mayer Srour, Elise Boulanger-Scemama, Lea Querques, Eric Souied; Impact of reticular pseudodrusen on macular function. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):6280.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the impact of reticular pseudodrusen on macular function using microperimetry.

Methods: Eighteen consecutive patients (18 eyes) with reticular pseudodrusen (group 1), and without medium/large drusen, underwent microperimetry. Eighteen age- and sex-matched subjects (18 eyes) with typical drusen and without pseudodrusen (group 2) also underwent microperimetry. Macular sensitivity was assessed by microperimetry and compared between the 2 groups.

Results: Mean age of patients with reticular pseudodrusen and with typical drusen was 77.3±6.8 and 75.0±9.9 year-old, respectively (p=0.4), and 61.1% and 61.1% were women, respectively. Mean best-corrected visual acuity was 0.14±0.09LogMAR and 0.13±0.09LogMAR (p=0.8), in group 1 and group 2, respectively. Microperimetry revealed a significant difference in overall mean macular sensitivity (‘‘square 7x7’’; 49 points) between group 1 and group 2 (5.9±1.7dB vs 8.8±2.4dB, p<0.001). Both mean central macular sensitivity (“square 3x3”; 9 points), and mean peripheral macular microperimetric sensitivity (overall ‘‘square 7x7” - central ’’square 3x3”; 40 points), were significantly reduced in group 1 compared with group 2 (central macular sensitivity: 6.9±1.7dB vs 8.9±2.6dB, group 1 and group 2, respectively; p=0.01) (peripheral macular sensitivity: 5.7±1.8dB vs 8.7±2.3dB, group 1 and group 2, respectively; p<0.001). In group 1, mean peripheral sensitivity was reduced when compared with mean central sensitivity (5.7±1.8dB vs 6.9±1.7dB, p=0.01), while, in group 2, mean sensitivity was similar in both peripheral and central macula (8.7±2.3dB vs 8.9±2.6dB, p=0.4).

Conclusions: We showed that eyes with reticular pseudodrusen present a greater extent of reduced sensitivity than eyes with typical drusen.

Keywords: 412 age-related macular degeneration • 504 drusen • 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical  
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