June 1984
Volume 25, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   June 1984
Contrast sensitivity loss in multiple sclerosis. Selectivity by eye, orientation, and spatial frequency measured with the evoked potential.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 1984, Vol.25, 632-639. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      M J Kupersmith, W H Seiple, J I Nelson, R E Carr; Contrast sensitivity loss in multiple sclerosis. Selectivity by eye, orientation, and spatial frequency measured with the evoked potential.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1984;25(6):632-639.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Multiple sclerosis can produce highly selective losses in visual function. Psychophysical studies have demonstrated contrast sensitivity deficits for spatial frequencies or for stimulus orientations. Using real-time lock-in retrieval of the visual evoked potential, the authors measured contrast sensitivity in 15 cases with probable or definite multiple sclerosis and acuities of 20/40 or better. Sine-wave grating contrast threshold determinations for three spatial frequencies (1, 4, and 8 cycles/deg) and four orientations (0, 45, 90, and 135 deg) revealed contrast deficits in at least one spatial frequency and orientation in every case. In most cases the visual losses were spotty or multifocal, and not the same in both eyes. Some cases with highly selective patterns of orientation or spatial frequency losses were observed and are discussed in terms of involvement of cortical functional architecture in the disease.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×