December 1987
Volume 28, Issue 12
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Articles  |   December 1987
Density and distribution of canine conjunctival goblet cells.
Author Affiliations
  • C P Moore
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia 65211.
  • N J Wilsman
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia 65211.
  • E V Nordheim
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia 65211.
  • L J Majors
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia 65211.
  • L L Collier
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia 65211.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 1987, Vol.28, 1925-1932. doi:
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      C P Moore, N J Wilsman, E V Nordheim, L J Majors, L L Collier; Density and distribution of canine conjunctival goblet cells.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1987;28(12):1925-1932. doi: .

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      © 2015 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Conjunctival goblet cells (GCs) were quantitated to establish baseline values for density and distribution of these cells in healthy canine eyes. From each of 18 sites, tissue was collected, sectioned at 2 micron, and stained with periodic acid Schiff stain. Within each sampling site, 500 epithelial cells (GCs, squamous, polygonal, and basal epithelial cells) were counted and the ratio of GCs to total epithelial cells was computed as an index of goblet cell density or goblet cell index (GCI). A heterogenous distribution of canine conjunctival goblets cells was demonstrated. Lower nasal fornix (LNf) and adjacent sites, lower middle fornix (LMf) and lower nasal tarsal (LNt), had the highest mean densities of goblet cells. In contrast, GCs were essentially absent from the upper and lower bulbar areas. Remaining sites had intermediate GCIs. Sex differences in GCIs were noted for LNf and LNt sites. Mean tear film breakup times (BUTs) were determined, and, for normal beagle dogs, were 19.38 (+/- 4.80 secs) OS and 19.96 (+/- 5.01 secs) OD. The similarities between canine and human conjunctival goblet cell distributions support the use of the dog for studying the conjunctival mucous system.

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