November 1987
Volume 28, Issue 11
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Articles  |   November 1987
Circadian rhythm in goldfish visual sensitivity.
Author Affiliations
  • C J Bassi
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • M K Powers
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science November 1987, Vol.28, 1811-1815. doi:
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      C J Bassi, M K Powers; Circadian rhythm in goldfish visual sensitivity.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1987;28(11):1811-1815.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

To determine whether rod-mediated vision in goldfish is regulated by a circadian clock, absolute threshold was measured psychophysically in animals maintained in constant darkness. Responses were recorded approximately every 4 hr to a diffuse 532 nm stimulus, 5 sec in duration, with no background light present. Visual threshold tended to be lowest at the time of transition from light to dark, as experienced by the fish before it was placed in constant darkness. Threshold tended to be highest at the time of transition from dark to light. The average peak-to-trough fluctuation for five fish was 0.5 log unit in amplitude, and its period was about 24 hr. The results show that the rhythm in visual threshold can still be detected after 7 days of darkness, and that it can be entrained to a new light-dark cycle. These properties are characteristic of regulation by a circadian oscillator.

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