October 1987
Volume 28, Issue 10
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Articles  |   October 1987
Lens protein composition, glycation and high molecular weight aggregation in aging rats.
Author Affiliations
  • M S Swamy
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta 30912-3331.
  • E C Abraham
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta 30912-3331.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1987, Vol.28, 1693-1701. doi:
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      M S Swamy, E C Abraham; Lens protein composition, glycation and high molecular weight aggregation in aging rats.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1987;28(10):1693-1701.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Because of minimal or no turnover, lens proteins are subjected to substantial post-translational modifications which in turn disrupt lens architecture and change the optical properties leading to senile cataract formation. Progressive glycation is believed to have the potential to initiate the changes that are conducive to lens opacification. Fisher 344 rats were systematically followed from juvenile to older and aged phases of their life to study the relationship between lens glycation and high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation as well as quantitative and qualitative changes in lens crystallins. Levels of glycated proteins were quantified by affinity chromatography. Changes in lens crystallin composition and HMW aggregate formation were monitored by molecular sieve HPLC, further confirmed by SDS-PAGE and IEF techniques. As the age advances HMW and insoluble proteins increase with a concomitant disappearance of gamma-crystallins from soluble fraction. This disappearance of gamma-crystallins coincided with increased glycation (approximately 2-fold higher in insoluble fraction) and decreased sulfhydryl groups from soluble fraction. It appears that lens protein glycation, disappearance of gamma-crystallins and sulfhydryls from soluble fraction and increase of insoluble fraction and HMW aggregate are interrelated.

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