November 1987
Volume 28, Issue 11
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Articles  |   November 1987
Sensitivities in older eyes with good acuity: eyes whose fellow eye has exudative AMD.
Author Affiliations
  • A Eisner
    Neurological Sciences Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center, Portland, OR 97209.
  • S A Fleming
    Neurological Sciences Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center, Portland, OR 97209.
  • M L Klein
    Neurological Sciences Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center, Portland, OR 97209.
  • W M Mauldin
    Neurological Sciences Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center, Portland, OR 97209.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science November 1987, Vol.28, 1832-1837. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      A Eisner, S A Fleming, M L Klein, W M Mauldin; Sensitivities in older eyes with good acuity: eyes whose fellow eye has exudative AMD.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1987;28(11):1832-1837.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

We compared several indices of foveal visual function between two groups of people aged 60 and older. One group was comprised of individuals who had good acuity in one eye, but had a history of exudative aging macular degeneration (AMD) in the other eye. We measured visual function in these individuals' good eyes only. The second group was a normative group; it was comprised of individuals who had good acuity in each eye. None of the eyes which we tested from either group had funduscopic evidence of macular pathology other than macular drusen and/or hypopigmentation. We found that eyes whose fellow eye had suffered from exudative AMD themselves suffered compromised foveal function, even when they retained 20/20 or better acuity. Losses of sensitivity mediated by blue-sensitive cones tended to be greater for 1 degree than for 3 degrees diameter test stimuli. Absolute sensitivity losses at long test wavelengths were probably due to several factors, including decreased effective cone photopigment density. Slow rates of recovery during dark adaptation were associated with the presence of many macular drusen and/or macular hypopigmentation. Eyes whose fellow eye had suffered from exudative AMD had more macular drusen and hypopigmentation than eyes whose fellow eye had not suffered from exudative AMD.

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