November 1987
Volume 28, Issue 11
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Articles  |   November 1987
Latent/manifest latent nystagmus reversal using an ocular prosthesis. Implications for vision and ocular dominance.
Author Affiliations
  • L F Dell'Osso
    Ocular Motor Neurophysiology Laboratory, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44106.
  • L A Abel
    Ocular Motor Neurophysiology Laboratory, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44106.
  • R B Daroff
    Ocular Motor Neurophysiology Laboratory, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44106.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science November 1987, Vol.28, 1873-1876. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      L F Dell'Osso, L A Abel, R B Daroff; Latent/manifest latent nystagmus reversal using an ocular prosthesis. Implications for vision and ocular dominance.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1987;28(11):1873-1876.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Latent/manifest latent nystagmus (LMLN) is a jerk nystagmus with a decreasing-velocity or linear slow phase whose fast phase is in the direction of the fixating eye. Change of the fixating eye by alternating tropias or cover will cause reversal of the LMLN to preserve this relationship. In the dark, where no fixation is possible, the fast phases of LMLN are in the direction of the intended fixating eye; actual visual input will override this effect of intention. A patient with persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous of the right eye, which was enucleated at age 9 due to glaucoma, had LMLN with fast phases to the left. His congenitally blind right eye was replaced with an ocular prosthesis whose movements were conjugate with his seeing eye. In the dark, we found that his LMLN spontaneously reversed as the normally fixating left eye became esotropic. Furthermore, as is the case with LMLN patients who have sight in both eyes, he was able to willfully reverse his LMLN in the dark by alternating his "fixating" eye. We conclude from these observations that the direction of LMLN is determined at a cortical level, is intimately related to the intended fixating eye and that eye "dominance" is predetermined and not altered by visual abnormalities, including blindness.

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