November 1991
Volume 32, Issue 12
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Articles  |   November 1991
The effects of Depo-Medrol preservative on the rabbit visual system.
Author Affiliations
  • A Loewenstein
    Department of Ophthalmology, Ichilov Hospital, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
  • E Zemel
    Department of Ophthalmology, Ichilov Hospital, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
  • M Lazar
    Department of Ophthalmology, Ichilov Hospital, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
  • I Perlman
    Department of Ophthalmology, Ichilov Hospital, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science November 1991, Vol.32, 3053-3060. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      A Loewenstein, E Zemel, M Lazar, I Perlman; The effects of Depo-Medrol preservative on the rabbit visual system.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1991;32(12):3053-3060.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Periocular injections of corticosteroids play an important role in the management of various ophthalmologic diseases. The Depo-Medrol vehicle, injected into the vitreous, was shown to be toxic to the lens and to the retina when applied at double strength. The authors examined the effects of Depo-Medrol and one of the components of its vehicle, myristyl-gamma-picolinium chloride (MGP), on the functional integrity of the rabbit visual system. Visual function was assessed objectively from the electroretinogram (ERG) and the visual evoked potential (VEP). The experimental drugs were injected into the vitreous humor of one eye while saline was injected into the fellow eye for control. Depo-Medrol did not produce any measurable effects on the ERG or the VEP. When MGP solutions were injected in concentrations at least twice as large as that in the Depo-Medrol, significant reductions in the light- and dark-adapted ERG responses were seen. The effects of the drug on the ERG responses was seen as early as 3 days postinjection and developed to its maximal level within 1-2 weeks. No ERG recovery was seen over a period of more than 2 months. The VEP, elicited by applying light stimuli to the experimental eye, was characterized by low amplitude and delayed implicit time compared with the response obtained from the control eye.

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