February 1991
Volume 32, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   February 1991
Growth of acanthamoeba on human corneal epithelial cells and keratocytes in vitro.
Author Affiliations
  • S S Stopak
    Eye & Ear Institute, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
  • M I Roat
    Eye & Ear Institute, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
  • R C Nauheim
    Eye & Ear Institute, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
  • P W Turgeon
    Eye & Ear Institute, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
  • G Sossi
    Eye & Ear Institute, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
  • R P Kowalski
    Eye & Ear Institute, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
  • R A Thoft
    Eye & Ear Institute, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1991, Vol.32, 354-359. doi:
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      S S Stopak, M I Roat, R C Nauheim, P W Turgeon, G Sossi, R P Kowalski, R A Thoft; Growth of acanthamoeba on human corneal epithelial cells and keratocytes in vitro.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1991;32(2):354-359.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Acanthamoebic keratitis, a potentially devastating infection usually associated with contact lens wear, has been recognized with increasing frequency in recent years. Once the Acanthamoeba organisms gain access to the human cornea, it is not clear which constituents of the corneal milieu provide a substrate for their growth. The growth of Acanthamoeba polyphaga was investigated on cultured monolayers of human corneal epithelial cells, stromal keratocytes, and stromal homogenate suspensions. Growth was determined through organism counts and observation of cytopathic effects on tissue culture dishes. Compared with tissue culture media controls, acanthamoebic growth was supported by cultured epithelial cells and keratocytes but not stromal homogenates. These results suggest that in acanthamoebic keratitis the organisms depend on the cellular components of the cornea as substrates for growth. This in vitro model may also provide further information on the pathogenesis of keratitis and a system for drug sensitivity testing.

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