August 1991
Volume 32, Issue 9
Free
Articles  |   August 1991
Infrared laser sclerostomies.
Author Affiliations
  • S A Ozler
    Department of Surgery, Beckman Laser Institute, Irvine, California.
  • R A Hill
    Department of Surgery, Beckman Laser Institute, Irvine, California.
  • J J Andrews
    Department of Surgery, Beckman Laser Institute, Irvine, California.
  • G Baerveldt
    Department of Surgery, Beckman Laser Institute, Irvine, California.
  • M W Berns
    Department of Surgery, Beckman Laser Institute, Irvine, California.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1991, Vol.32, 2498-2503. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      S A Ozler, R A Hill, J J Andrews, G Baerveldt, M W Berns; Infrared laser sclerostomies.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1991;32(9):2498-2503.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Four solid-state lasers with three fiberoptic delivery systems were used to perform laser sclerostomies in an acute-injury rabbit model and in fresh human globes. The lasers used were continuous-wave neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG, 1.06 microns) and pulsed holmium:yttrium scandium galliam garnet (YSGG) (2.10 microns), erbium:YSGG (2.79 microns), and erbium:YAG (2.94 microns). Thermal damage to tissue and total laser energy required to produce sclerostomies decreased with increasing wavelength. In human tissue using a 600-microns fused silica fiberoptic, maximum thermal damage (greater than or equal to 100 microns) was noted at 1.06 microns with a total energy of 21 J at a power density of 2.5 kW/cm2. In addition, focal damage to the iris and ciliary body was noted at this wavelength. The least amount of thermal damage (15-20 microns) and lowest total energies needed were found at 2.94 microns. A 250-microseconds pulse length and pulse radiant exposures of 3.6 J/cm2 and 14.3 J/cm2 were used for the low hydroxyl-fused silica (500 microns) and zirconium fluoride (250 microns) fiberoptics, respectively. Although zirconium fluoride fibers have high through-put efficiencies that facilitate study of laser tissue interactions at 2.94 microns, problems encountered with fragility and solubility of the bare tip in aqueous media limit its usefulness. A high attenuation rate with the low hydroxyl-fused silica fiber limited its usable length to 35 cm at 2.94 microns. Tissue damage during sclerostomy formation was minimized at 2.94 microns, reaching a maximum at 1.06 microns. Minimizing tissue damage theoretically could decrease subconjunctival scarring and filtration failure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×