January 1994
Volume 35, Issue 1
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Articles  |   January 1994
Effect of light on oxygen-induced retinopathy in the mouse.
Author Affiliations
  • E Wesolowski
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
  • L E Smith
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1994, Vol.35, 112-119. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      E Wesolowski, L E Smith; Effect of light on oxygen-induced retinopathy in the mouse.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1994;35(1):112-119.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine the effect lf light on retinal neovascularization and vasculogenesis in a reproducible and quantifiable model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy in the mouse. METHODS: C57Bl/6J mice were reared in room air, 68% oxygen, or 75% oxygen and were exposed to darkness, low cyclical light (200-350 lux), or high-intensity continuous light (3000-4500 lux). The entire retinal vascular pattern was visualized in fluorescein-dextran perfused flat-mount preparations. Proliferative retinopathy was quantified by counting neovascular nuclei in 6 microns cross-sections of whole eyes. RESULTS: Light exposure did not exacerbate the proliferative retinopathy that was seen after 68% oxygen exposure, which induced a meager proliferative response, nor after 75% oxygen exposure, which induced an exuberant proliferative response. In room air, retinas from all three illumination groups had normal vascular patterns. CONCLUSIONS: In this model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, under the conditions tested, light neither exacerbated the hyperoxia-induced neovascularization nor affected normal retinal vascular development.

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