October 1990
Volume 31, Issue 10
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Articles  |   October 1990
Increase in lens gangliosides due to aging and cataract progression in human senile cataract.
Author Affiliations
  • M Ogiso
    Department of Physiology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
  • N Saito
    Department of Physiology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
  • K Sudo
    Department of Physiology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
  • H Kubo
    Department of Physiology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
  • S Hirano
    Department of Physiology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
  • M Komoto
    Department of Physiology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1990, Vol.31, 2171-2179. doi:https://doi.org/
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      M Ogiso, N Saito, K Sudo, H Kubo, S Hirano, M Komoto; Increase in lens gangliosides due to aging and cataract progression in human senile cataract.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1990;31(10):2171-2179. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Gangliosides were isolated from human senile cataractous lenses by solvent extraction, DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography, and thin-layer chromatography. The content and composition of gangliosides were examined in individual lens tissues. Three predominant gangliosides, GM3, GM1, and GD1a, were tentatively identified in comparison with authentic brain gangliosides, and several unidentified gangliosides were also recognized. The increase in ganglioside content per mg of protein content in cataractous lenses was found to be influenced by two physiologic parameters: aging and cataract progression. The mature cataractous lenses showed a higher ganglioside level on a protein basis than the immature lenses compared with the same age group. On the basis of statistical analysis, an age-dependent increase in ganglioside concentration was recognized in both mature and immature lens groups. The relative increase in slow-moving polysialogangliosides on thin-layer chromatography seemed to be caused by the maturation of cataract. The sugar composition of one of the polysialogangliosides was found to be glucose, galactose, and sialic acid in the molar ratio of 2:1:4; this suggests the presence of a unique ganglioside species in human cataractous lens.

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