January 1994
Volume 35, Issue 1
Free
Articles  |   January 1994
Lysosomal enzyme and inhibitor levels in the human trabecular meshwork.
Author Affiliations
  • S Sawaguchi
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago 60612.
  • B Y Yue
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago 60612.
  • J E Kawa
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago 60612.
  • I L Chang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago 60612.
  • S S Twining
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago 60612.
  • B Meberg
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago 60612.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1994, Vol.35, 251-261. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      S Sawaguchi, B Y Yue, J E Kawa, I L Chang, S S Twining, B Meberg; Lysosomal enzyme and inhibitor levels in the human trabecular meshwork.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1994;35(1):251-261.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine in the human trabecular meshwork lysosomal enzymes and one inhibitor of serine proteases that actively participate in the degradation of macromolecules into low molecular weight constituents. METHODS: Using an avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique, lysosomal proteases and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor were examined in the trabecular meshwork of 23 human eyes with donor ages ranging from 2 to 90 years. These eyes were categorized into three age groups (< or = 20, 21 to 49, and > or = 50 years). Histochemical staining for lysosomal hydrolases was also performed on frozen sections of 20 human eyes. The staining was analyzed by an image analyzer and the levels of lysosomal proteases were further measured by biochemical assays. RESULTS: The trabecular meshwork from all the eyes stained intensely against antibodies to cathepsins B and G and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor. The staining for elastase was weaker but evident. Image analyses revealed that the staining intensity for each protease or inhibitor was similar in all age groups. The staining in the uveal meshwork appeared to be the strongest among all the trabecular meshwork regions. Biochemical assays of tissue extracts confirmed that the enzyme and inhibitor levels were comparable among the three donor age groups. Activities of two lysosomal hydrolases, acid phosphatase and acid esterase, were also found in trabecular meshwork cells of 20 eyes. No apparent difference in enzyme activities was found with increasing age, and variation related to region was not observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated the age-independent distribution of a variety of lysosomal enzymes and a protease inhibitor in the human trabecular meshwork. The presence of these proteins suggests a possible role in the metabolic operation of the trabecular meshwork.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×