March 1994
Volume 35, Issue 3
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Articles  |   March 1994
Effect of ethacrynic acid on aqueous outflow dynamics in monkeys.
Author Affiliations
  • M A Croft
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison.
  • W C Hubbard
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison.
  • P L Kaufman
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 1994, Vol.35, 1167-1175. doi:
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      M A Croft, W C Hubbard, P L Kaufman; Effect of ethacrynic acid on aqueous outflow dynamics in monkeys.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1994;35(3):1167-1175.

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the long-term effect of ethacrynic acid (ECA) on aqueous outflow dynamics in ocular normotensive monkeys. METHODS: (1) Twelve cynomolgus monkeys received 10 microliters of 2.5 mM (= 7.5 micrograms) ECA intracamerally in one eye, vehicle in the other; outflow facility (perfusion) was determined at 1 hour, 24 hours, or 1 week, and intraocular pressure (IOP; applanation) at 24 hours, 1 week, and 6 to 7 weeks later. Six other cynomolgi received 10 microliters of 0.13 or 1.3 mM phalloidin in one eye 45 minutes before receiving ECA OU; facility was measured 1 hour after ECA. (2) Groups of five rhesus monkeys underwent intracameral injection of 2.5, 5.0, or 10 micrograms ECA in one eye, vehicle in the other, with IOP measured hours to weeks thereafter. (3) Five rhesus monkeys received 540 micrograms of ECA unilaterally as a 30-microliter topical drop once daily for 4 days. On the first and fourth treatment days, baseline IOP, pupil diameter, and refraction were measured immediately before and again at 2, 4, and 7 hours after topical treatment. RESULTS: (1) ECA divided by vehicle facility averaged 1.83 +/- 0.23 (SEM) (P < 0.02, n = 6), 1.50 +/- 0.27 (P < 0.11, n = 7), and 1.05 +/- 0.10 (n = 7) at 1 hour, 24 hours, and 1 week, respectively. IOP was 1 to 2 mm Hg lower in ECA eyes 24 hours (P < 0.05, n = 5) and 6 to 7 weeks (P < 0.05, n = 7) after treatment. Phalloidin did not diminish the 1-hour ECA facility effect. (2) Five (but not 2.5 or 10) micrograms of ECA lowered IOP 1 to 3 mm Hg, starting at 2 hours and lasting up to 48 hours. The maximum ECA effect (-2.6 +/- 0.25 mm Hg; P < 0.001, n = 5) occurred at 4 hours. IOP, corneal thickness and endothelial cell count, and anterior chamber depth were not significantly different 8 weeks after 5 micrograms ECA or vehicle. (3) Once-daily unilateral topical application of 540 micrograms of ECA induced no change in IOP, refraction, or pupil diameter compared to contralateral vehicle-treated control eyes. There were no significant ECA-related ocular bio-microscopic abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: ECA may lower IOP and increase outflow facility longer than previously thought, but not by affecting meshwork actin filaments.

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