May 1995
Volume 36, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   May 1995
The effects of acetazolamide on the electroretinographic responses in rats.
Author Affiliations
  • O Findl
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • R M Hansen
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • A B Fulton
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1995, Vol.36, 1019-1026. doi:
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      O Findl, R M Hansen, A B Fulton; The effects of acetazolamide on the electroretinographic responses in rats.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1995;36(6):1019-1026.

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To study the mechanisms and sites of action of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide (AZM), on the rod- and cone-mediated electroretinogram (ERG) of the dark-adapted rat. METHODS: After a within-subjects design, ERG responses to brief, full-field flashes were recorded from adult (60 to 90 days old) albino rats, with and without AZM (5 mg/100 g, intraperitoneally). Flickering stimuli (6 and 26 Hz) were used to study rod- and cone-mediated responses. Aspartate-isolated responses of the isolated retina were recorded with and without AZM in the superfusate. The a-wave and PIII responses were fitted with a model of the rod's response by estimating the maximum response (Rmp3), sensitivity (S), and delay td. The b-wave response amplitude and implicit time were examined as a function of stimulus energy. The parameters obtained in the AZM-treated and untreated conditions were compared. RESULTS: Acetazolamide causes a significant decrease in saturated rod response, b-wave amplitude, aspartate-isolated PIII, and the rod- and cone-mediated responses to flickering light. The estimated sensitivity of the rod response (S), b-wave sensitivity, and b-wave implicit time are not altered significantly by AZM. CONCLUSION: Acetazolamide, probably through mechanisms that acidify the retina, attenuates the amplitudes of the retinal responses without significant effect on sensitivity.

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