April 1995
Volume 36, Issue 5
Free
Articles  |   April 1995
Immunohistochemical pathology of the corneal endothelium in iridocorneal endothelial syndrome.
Author Affiliations
  • L W Hirst
    Division of Ophthalmology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Australia.
  • J Bancroft
    Division of Ophthalmology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Australia.
  • K Yamauchi
    Division of Ophthalmology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Australia.
  • W R Green
    Division of Ophthalmology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Australia.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1995, Vol.36, 820-827. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      L W Hirst, J Bancroft, K Yamauchi, W R Green; Immunohistochemical pathology of the corneal endothelium in iridocorneal endothelial syndrome.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1995;36(5):820-827.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate immunohistochemical staining of the endothelia of corneas from patients with clinical diagnoses of iridocorneal endothelial (ICE) syndrome. METHODS: Corneas diagnosed with ICE syndrome and removed during corneal transplantation were freshly frozen, sectioned, and stained with monoclonal antibodies to keratin subgroups, vimentin, desmin, and a series of other antibodies against intermediate filaments. Transmission electron microscopy was performed on segments of these corneas fixed in glutaraldehyde. RESULTS: There was almost universal staining of the endothelial layer with A1 and A3 keratin monoclonal antibodies and vimentin. Transmission electron microscopy of the corneas also confirmed features consistent with keratin. CONCLUSIONS: The "endothelial" cell layer in the iridocorneal endothelial syndrome has electron microscopic and immunohistochemical characteristics of epithelial-like cells, but it also cross-reacts with vimentin, suggesting that these cells retain or derive some endothelial staining characteristics as well. This "epithelialization" of the endothelial layer may explain the progressive cellular proliferation across angle and iris similar to that seen in iatrogenic epithelial downgrowth and posterior polymorphous endothelial dystrophy.

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