April 1995
Volume 36, Issue 5
Free
Articles  |   April 1995
Color Doppler imaging: a new technique to assess orbital blood flow in patients with diabetic retinopathy.
Author Affiliations
  • W Goebel
    Department of Ophthalmology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
  • W E Lieb
    Department of Ophthalmology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
  • A Ho
    Department of Ophthalmology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
  • R C Sergott
    Department of Ophthalmology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
  • R Farhoumand
    Department of Ophthalmology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
  • F Grehn
    Department of Ophthalmology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1995, Vol.36, 864-870. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      W Goebel, W E Lieb, A Ho, R C Sergott, R Farhoumand, F Grehn; Color Doppler imaging: a new technique to assess orbital blood flow in patients with diabetic retinopathy.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1995;36(5):864-870.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

PURPOSE: Color Doppler imaging is a new noninvasive technique that enables measuring blood flow velocity in small orbital vessels, arteries as well as veins. Because hemodynamic changes are seen in patients with diabetic retinopathy by other techniques, the authors compared 61 eyes with proliferative, 59 eyes with nonproliferative, and 26 eyes with preproliferative diabetic fundus changes with a matched control group of 70 patients without diabetes (128 eyes). METHODS: The central retinal artery (CRA), short posterior ciliary artery (PCA), and ophthalmic artery (OA) of all patients were examined, and the systolic, diastolic, and mean velocities were measured for each vessel. RESULTS: Differences between the groups were most prominent in the CRA. The perfusion velocity was significantly lower (P < 0.001) in proliferative eyes (Vsystolic 5.7 +/- 1.8 cm/sec) than in the control group (Vsystolic 9.4 +/- 1.2 cm/sec) or in nonproliferative eyes (Vsystolic 8.4 +/- 1.8 cm/sec). In the preproliferative group, there was greater variability in velocity distribution. Consequently, no statistically significant difference could be deduced, either in the group with background retinopathy or in the group with proliferative diabetes. In the OA and PCA, neither group showed significant differences from normal. CONCLUSIONS: Measurements indicate a correlation between severity of diabetic retinopathy and decreased flow velocity in the CRA.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×