April 1997
Volume 38, Issue 5
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Articles  |   April 1997
Acute effects of blood glucose on chromatic visually evoked potentials in persons with diabetes and in normal persons.
Author Affiliations
  • M E Schneck
    School of Optometry, University of California at Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • B Fortune
    School of Optometry, University of California at Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • E Switkes
    School of Optometry, University of California at Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • M Crognale
    School of Optometry, University of California at Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • A J Adams
    School of Optometry, University of California at Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1997, Vol.38, 800-810. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M E Schneck, B Fortune, E Switkes, M Crognale, A J Adams; Acute effects of blood glucose on chromatic visually evoked potentials in persons with diabetes and in normal persons.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(5):800-810.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine whether specific chromatic pathways are selectively affected by short-term variations in blood glucose levels in observers with and without diabetes. METHODS: Ten subjects with diabetes, all with type 1 diabetes and no retinopathy, and eight age-similar normal subjects were tested. Cortical visually evoked potentials (VEPs) in response to stimuli designed to selectively activate the short-wavelength-sensitive (S) or long- and middle-wavelength-sensitive (LM) chromatic (isoluminant) pathways or the achromatic pathway were recorded over a period of several hours. Capillary blood glucose also was measured repeatedly over the same period. The relation between VEP latency and blood glucose was determined. RESULTS: The S-pathway VEP latency was correlated significantly with blood glucose in a slight majority (6/10) of persons with diabetes; S-pathway latency was longer at higher blood glucose levels. This association between S-pathway latency and blood glucose was not dependent on the pattern of blood glucose variation over time (i.e., significant correlations between blood glucose and latency were observed in persons for whom blood glucose increased, decreased, or rose and then fell over time). No dependence on blood glucose was observed for LM- or achromatic-pathway VEP latency in subjects with diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Acute variations in blood glucose of subjects with diabetes over hours selectively affect the function of the short-wavelength-sensitive chromatic pathway. The findings are discussed within the context of known mechanisms by which elevated glucose affects cellular metabolism with a time course consistent with the transient nature of the effect observed.

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