June 1995
Volume 36, Issue 7
Free
Articles  |   June 1995
Systemic immunization with Hsp60 alters the development of chlamydial ocular disease.
Author Affiliations
  • R G Rank
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock 72205, USA.
  • C Dascher
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock 72205, USA.
  • A K Bowlin
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock 72205, USA.
  • P M Bavoil
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock 72205, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 1995, Vol.36, 1344-1351. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      R G Rank, C Dascher, A K Bowlin, P M Bavoil; Systemic immunization with Hsp60 alters the development of chlamydial ocular disease.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1995;36(7):1344-1351.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine whether immunization with recombinant Hsp60 would exacerbate ocular pathology on challenge with viable chlamydial elementary bodies. METHODS: Guinea pigs were immunized either subcutaneously with recombinant Hsp60 or both subcutaneously with recombinant Hsp60 and ocularly with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium expressing the guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) Hsp60 antigen. All animals were challenged in the conjunctiva with the agent of GPIC, and the degree of gross ocular pathology was determined. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody titers to Hsp60 were measured in ocular secretions as a measure of the degree of immunization. RESULTS: In primary and challenge GPIC infection, the degree of gross ocular pathology was lower in the immunized group. The presence of high IgA and IgG antibody titers to Hsp60 in tears suggested that the response may have been modified by the presence of blocking antibodies that either may have removed the antigen quickly or prevented interaction with sensitized T cells. In contrast to subcutaneous immunization, the combined immunization regimen, consisting of subcutaneous recombinant Hsp60 followed by ocular inoculation of the attenuated Salmonella, resulted in no difference in gross pathology after reinfection of guinea pigs with GPIC. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicated that the immunization with Hsp60 did not produce exacerbated disease on challenge with viable organisms; however, the data suggested that the route of administration, form of antigen, or both may be critical in the disease process.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×