May 1997
Volume 38, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   May 1997
Matrix stimulates the proliferation of human corneal endothelial cells in culture.
Author Affiliations
  • D A Blake
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA.
  • H Yu
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA.
  • D L Young
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA.
  • D R Caldwell
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1997, Vol.38, 1119-1129. doi:
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      D A Blake, H Yu, D L Young, D R Caldwell; Matrix stimulates the proliferation of human corneal endothelial cells in culture.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(6):1119-1129.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Extracellular matrices were tested for their ability to support the adhesion and proliferation of human corneal endothelial cells. METHODS: Human corneal endothelial cells were plated onto tissue culture dishes coated with purified fibronectin or a matrix elaborated by cultured bovine corneal endothelial cells. The presence of human cells in the cultures was confirmed by karyotyping. Cell size at increasing passage number was analyzed, and cellular response to growth factors was assessed using a 96-well microtiter plate assay. RESULTS: When tissue culture dishes were coated with fibronectin, the cells attached to the dish but grew slowly. Human corneal endothelial cells plated onto the matrices elaborated by bovine corneal endothelial cells attached to the culture dish and grew to fill the flask. At confluence, the cells had a hexagonal morphology similar to that seen in vivo. Karyotype analysis showed that the cells were of human and not bovine origin. The time required for senescence in culture was dependent on the age of the donor cornea. The bovine matrices enhanced the proliferative response of human corneal endothelial cell cultures to endothelial cell growth supplement and keratinocyte growth factor. Epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor stimulated human cell proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, regardless of the substratum on which the cells were plated. CONCLUSIONS: The use of substratum elaborated by bovine corneal endothelial cells has proved useful in the preparation of human endothelial cell cultures from juvenile and adult donors. The method has been used to establish cultures from more than 50 donors from age 1 day to 76 years.

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