January 1997
Volume 38, Issue 1
Free
Articles  |   January 1997
Motion detection deficits in infantile esotropia without nystagmus.
Author Affiliations
  • J Shallo-Hoffmann
    MRC Human Movement and Balance Unit, Institute of Neurology, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
  • M Faldon
    MRC Human Movement and Balance Unit, Institute of Neurology, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
  • S Hague
    MRC Human Movement and Balance Unit, Institute of Neurology, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
  • P Riordan-Eva
    MRC Human Movement and Balance Unit, Institute of Neurology, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
  • P Fells
    MRC Human Movement and Balance Unit, Institute of Neurology, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
  • M Gresty
    MRC Human Movement and Balance Unit, Institute of Neurology, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1997, Vol.38, 219-226. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      J Shallo-Hoffmann, M Faldon, S Hague, P Riordan-Eva, P Fells, M Gresty; Motion detection deficits in infantile esotropia without nystagmus.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(1):219-226.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate whether adults with infantile strabismus but without latent nystagmus have abnormalities of horizontal motion detection. METHODS: Eleven adult subjects with infantile esotropia but without latent nystagmus and 15 control subjects were required to detect the onset of motion and drift direction of a sinusoidal, spatial frequency grating that moved with linearly increasing velocity. The grating was presented monocularly in paracentral vision at an eccentricity of 16.5 degrees with a field size of 18 degrees. The contrast of the grating was just above contrast threshold for visibility. RESULTS: The mean velocity threshold for detection of motion was raised significantly in the patient group compared with the control group. Nine of the 11 subjects with infantile esotropia demonstrated directional asymmetry for the detection of motion. Thresholds were elevated more often when the grating was moving nasally in the squinting eye and temporally in the nonsquinting eye, and raised thresholds were more prevalent in the squinting eye. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that in infantile esotropia, the presence of motion perception deficits are not always associated with the development of latent nystagmus. The predominance of nasally directed motion deficits in the squinting eye and temporally directed motion deficits in the nonsquinting eye was unexpected and may have been caused by abnormal development of cortical motion processing.

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