May 1997
Volume 38, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   May 1997
Dark-adapted thresholds in children with histories of mild retinopathy of prematurity.
Author Affiliations
  • D S Reisner
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • R M Hansen
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • O Findl
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • R A Petersen
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • A B Fulton
    Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1997, Vol.38, 1175-1183. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      D S Reisner, R M Hansen, O Findl, R A Petersen, A B Fulton; Dark-adapted thresholds in children with histories of mild retinopathy of prematurity.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(6):1175-1183.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that rod-mediated visual thresholds at 10 degrees eccentricity are elevated in children with histories of mild retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). METHODS: Dark-adapted thresholds for detection of 50 msec, 2 degrees diameter spots at a 10 degrees eccentric site, and at a peripheral reference site, 30 degrees eccentric, were measured in 20 children with a history of mild ROP and known courses of refractive development. Ten myopic control subjects also were tested. The thresholds of the ROP and control subjects were compared. RESULTS: Six of the subjects with ROP had elevated thresholds at the 10 degrees site. High myopia had been present since age 18 months or younger in each of the six. The thresholds of all other subjects with ROP, whose courses of refractive development had been toward emmetropia, and the control subjects with myopia were normal. In subjects with ROP, the association of early, persistent high myopia and an elevated threshold at 10 degrees was significant (chi 2 = 20; P < 0.01). Among the subjects with ROP, refractive error and axial length were correlated. CONCLUSIONS: ROP or factors causing ROP appear to alter rod-mediated retinal function. The association of abnormal rod-mediated sensitivity and refractive development suggests that rod-mediated retinal function is involved in the regulation of eye growth in children with a history of mild ROP.

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