May 1970
Volume 9, Issue 5
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Articles  |   May 1970
Anterior Chamber Measurements on CO2 Laser Corneal Irradiation
Author Affiliations
  • D. MACKEEN
    Department of Biophysics and Bio-Medical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. Ophthalmic Pathology Branch, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, and the Department of Ophthalmology, The George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • S. FINE
    Department of Biophysics and Bio-Medical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. Ophthalmic Pathology Branch, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, and the Department of Ophthalmology, The George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • L. FEIGEN
    Department of Biophysics and Bio-Medical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. Ophthalmic Pathology Branch, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, and the Department of Ophthalmology, The George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • B. S. FINE
    Department of Biophysics and Bio-Medical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. Ophthalmic Pathology Branch, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, and the Department of Ophthalmology, The George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1970, Vol.9, 366-371. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      D. MACKEEN, S. FINE, L. FEIGEN, B. S. FINE; Anterior Chamber Measurements on CO2 Laser Corneal Irradiation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1970;9(5):366-371.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

At threshold irradiation (∼ 0.1 w./cm.2) of the rabbit cornea with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser, there was no detectable rise in intraocular pressure and only a slight (1 to 2° C.) rise in aqueous temperature. On suprathreshold CO2 corneal irradiation, the intraocular pressure rose to a plateau during irradiation and then gradually fell. There was a concomitant rise in temperature in the anterior chamber caused by heat conduction from the site of corneal irradiation. Further rise in the temperature of the corneal stroma to the critical temperature range for heat shrinkage of collagen causes the cornea to thicken. This thickening of the cornea helps to bring heated aqueous under the irradiated site more closely in apposition to the lens and iris, thus further increasing the temperature of the anterior lens. Lens indentation was observed in fixed eyes only following pulses of sufficient power and duration to raise the temperature near the surface of the anterior lens to a range of at least 60 to 70° C. Increase in aqueous protein occurred only with irradiation over regions of the iris diaphragm.

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