October 1988
Volume 29, Issue 10
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Articles  |   October 1988
Altering body position affects intraocular pressure and visual function.
Author Affiliations
  • B J Linder
    Department of Ophthalmology, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.
  • G L Trick
    Department of Ophthalmology, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.
  • M L Wolf
    Department of Ophthalmology, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1988, Vol.29, 1492-1497. doi:
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      B J Linder, G L Trick, M L Wolf; Altering body position affects intraocular pressure and visual function.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(10):1492-1497.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Intraocular pressure (IOP) can be altered by changing body position. This report describes two experiments evaluating variations in IOP, as well as neural functioning of the retina and visual cortex (as measured by pattern-reversal electroretinogram and visual evoked potential), associated with whole-body, head-down tilt. The subjects, ten per experiment, were visually normal with IOP less than 19. In the first experiment, IOP elevations were induced by varying the angle of tilt in discrete steps between +90 degrees (upright) and -90 degrees (inverted). In each position IOP was measured and significant elevations (up to 3x baseline) were noted. These elevations were maintained for 1 min during which simultaneous retinal and cortical biopotentials were measured. In the second experiment, 6 degrees head-down tilt was maintained for 2 hr during which time the IOP and both biopotentials were measured repeatedly. Our findings confirm the effect of body position of IOP, while also revealing that head-down tilt produces significant reductions in neurophysiological function at both the retinal and cortical levels. The neural effect is maximized when 6 degrees head-down tilt is maintained for 20 min.

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